Undergraduate Academic Programs / Departments / Courses

83 Physics

http://upei.ca/physics

Physics Faculty
Derek W. Lawther, Associate Professor, Chair
Sheldon Opps, Professor
James Polson, Professor
William Whelan, Professor
Douglas C. Dahn, Associate Professor
Michelle Patterson, Adjunct Professor

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN PHYSICS
Students who intend to major in Physics are advised to consult the Department before registration. The normal University requirements must be met in addition to the Departmental requirements listed below. In exceptional cases, courses may be taken in a different sequence provided that the pertinent prerequisites are fulfilled or permission is granted by the Department.

Semester hours of credit
First Year  
Physics 1110-1120  General Physics I and II 6
Mathematics 1910-1920  Single Variable Calculus I and II 8
Chemistry 1110-1120 General Chemistry I and II 6
Computer Science 1910  Computer Science I 3
UPEI 1010, 1020 OR 1030 3
Electives (Biology 1310-1320 are highly recommended) 6
Second Year
Physics 2010  Waves and Oscillations 3
Physics 2020 Mechanics 3
Physics 2120 Electricity, Magnetism, and Circuits 3
Physics 2210 Modern Physics 3
Physics 2820 Mathematical Physics 3
Physics 2030 Computational Physics 3
Mathematics 2610 Linear Algebra I 3
Mathematics 2910 Multivariable and Vector Calculus 4
Electives 6
Third and Fourth Years
Physics 3120 Electromagnetism I        
3
Physics 3220 Quantum Physics I 3
Physics 3330 Experimental Physics I 3
Physics 3720 Statistical Physics I 3
Physics 4430 Experimental Physics II 3
Physics- Three additional Physics courses taken at the 3000 level or above, but at least one must be above the 3000 level 9
Electives (Mathematics 3010 is highly recommended) 33
Total 120 

                                                                                 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SPECIALIZATION IN MEDICAL AND BIOLOGICAL PHYSICS
Students can specialize in Medical and Biological Physics within the Major  in Physics program.

First Year Semester hours of credit
Physics 1110-1120 General Physics I and II     
6
Mathematics 1910-1920 1920 Single Variable Calculus I and II 8
Chemistry 1110-1120 General Chemistry I and II 6
Computer Science 1910 Computer Science I 3
Biology 1210-1230 OR Biology 1310-1320 6
UPEI 1010, 1020 OR 1030 3
Second Year
Physics 2010 Waves and Oscillations                
3
Physics 2020 Mechanics 3
Physics 2120 Electricity, Magnetism, and Circuits 3
Physics 2210 Modern Physics 3
Physics 2430 Physics of the Human Body 3
Physics 2820 Mathematical Physics 3
Physics 2030 Computational Physics 3
Mathematics 2610 Linear Algebra I 3
Mathematics 2910 Multivariable and Vector Calculus 4
Electives 3
Third and Fourth Years
Physics 3120 Electromagnetism I                    
3
Physics 3220 Quantum Physics I 3
Physics 3330 Experimental Physics I 3
Physics 3420 Introduction to Medical Physics 3
Physics 3520 Biomedical Imaging 3
Physics 3720 Statistical Physics I 3
Physics 4430 Experimental Physics II 3
Physics—One additional Physics course taken at the 3000 level or above 3
Electives (Biology 2260 and Biology 4010 are highly recommended. Mathematics 3010 is highly recommended) 33
Total 120

 

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONOURS IN PHYSICS
The Honours program in Physics is intended to provide research experience at the undergraduate level. It is designed for students who are interested in continuing their studies at the graduate level in Physics or related fields, or who are planning careers where research experience would be an asset.  The Honours program comprises a total of 126 semester hours of course credit, including a research project worth 12 semester hours. A total of at least 60 semester hours of Physics is required (16 courses plus project).

COURSE REQUIREMENTS
The normal University requirements must be met in addition to the Departmental requirements listed below. Biology 1310 and 1320 are highly recommended electives.

     Semester hours of credit
First Year  
Physics 1110-1120 General Physics I and I
6
Mathematics 1910-1920 Single Variable
Calculus I and II
8
Computer Science 1910 Computer Science I 3
Chemistry 1110-1120 General Chemistry I/II 6
UPEI 1010, 1020 OR 1030 First Year Experience 3
Electives (Biology 1310-1320 are highly recommended) 6
Second Year
Physics 2010 Waves and Oscillations
3
Physics 2020 Mechanics 3
Physics 2120 Electricity, Magnetism, and Circuits 3
Physics 2210 Modern Physics 3
Physics 2030 Computational Physics 3
Physics 2820 Mathematical Physics 3
Mathematics 2610 Linear Algebra I 3
Mathematics 2910 Multivariable and Vector Calculus 4
Electives 6
Third and Fourth Years
Physics 3010 Advanced Mechanics        
3
Physics 3120 Electromagnetism I 3
Physics 3220 Quantum Physics I 3
Physics 3330 Experimental Physics I 3
Physics 3720 Statistical Physics I 3
Physics 4020 Statistical Physics II 3
Physics 4120 Electromagnetism II 3
Physics 4210 Quantum Physics II 3
Physics 4430 Experimental Physics II 3
Physics 4900 Advanced Research and Thesis 12
Mathematics 3010 Differential Equations 3
At least one additional Math course at the 3000 or 4000 level 3
Electives, at least one of which must be an additional Physics Course at the 3000 level or above 18
Total 126

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS
For admission to the program, students must normally have a minimum average of 70% in all previous courses. First-class or high second-class standing in all previous Physics courses is expected. Permission of the Department is required.

Acceptance will be contingent upon the student’s finding a project advisor, approval of the research project topic, and the Department’s assessment of the student’s suitability for the program. Students interested in doing Honours should consult the Department Chair as early as possible, normally before the beginning of the student’s third year, and no later than January 31 of the third year. Before registering for Physics 4900, the student must have been accepted into the Honours program, and the project topic must be approved by the Department.

To graduate with Honours in Physics, the student must maintain a minimum average of 75% in all Physics courses combined. Students must also maintain a minimum overall average of 70% in each of the four years of study.

SPECIALIZATION IN MEDICAL AND BIOLOGICAL PHYSICS
Students can specialize in Medical and Biological Physics within the Honours in Physics program.

Semester hours of credit
First Year
Physics 1110-1120 General Physics I and II   
6
Mathematics 1910-1920 Single Variable Calculus
I and II
8
Chemistry 1110-1120 General Chemistry I and II 6
Computer Science 1910 Computer Science I 3
Biology 1210-1230 OR Biology 1310-1320 6
UPEI 1010, 1020 OR 1030  First Year Experience 3
Second Year
Physics 2010 Waves and Oscillations                    
3
Physics 2020 Mechanics 3
Physics 2120 Electricity, Magnetism, and Circuits 3
Physics 2210 Modern Physics 3
Physics 2430 Physics of the Human Body 3
Physics 2030 Computational Physics 3
Physics 2820 Mathematical Physics 3
Mathematics 2610 Linear Algebra I 3
Mathematics 2910 Multivariable and Vector Calculus 4
Electives 3
Third and Fourth Years
Physics 3010 Advanced Mechanics 3
Physics 3120 Electromagnetism I
3
Physics 3220 Quantum Physics I 3
Physics 3330 Experimental Physics I 3
Physics 3420 Introduction to Medical Physics 3
Physics 3520 Biomedical Imaging 3
Physics 3720 Statistical Physics I 3
Physics 4020 Statistical Physics II 3
Physics 4120 Electromagnetism II 3
Physics 4210 Quantum Physics II 3
Physics 4430 Experimental Physics II 3
Physics 4900 Advanced Research and Thesis 12
Mathematics 3010 Differential Equations 3
At least one additional Math course at the
3000 or 4000 level
3
Electives, at least one of which must be an additional Physics course at the 3000 level or above (Biology 2260 and Biology 4010 are highly recommended, if Biology 1210-1230 NOT taken.) 12
Total 126

The honours research project will be relevant to Medical or Biological physics.

CO-OP EDUCATION in PHYSICS

The UPEI Co-op Program is an integrated approach to university education which enables students to alternate academic terms on campus with work terms in suitable employment. The success of such programs is founded on the principle that students are able to apply theoretical knowledge from course studies in the workplace and return to the classroom with practical workplace experience. Students who successfully complete all the requirements of the program will have the notation entered on their transcripts and on the graduation parchment.

Students accepted into the program complete at least three paid work terms of normally 14–16 weeks duration, but at least 12 weeks, and three professional development courses. Credits earned through completion of work terms are counted as general electives.

The Co-op option is available to full-time students in the Physics Major or Honours program. Applications to the Co-op Education Program are normally made after completion of the first year of study.

See the Co-operative Education Program section of the UPEI Academic Calendar for more information.

MINOR IN PHYSICS
Students in the Minor Program in Physics must complete a total of 21 semester hours of Physics including:
Physics 1110 – 3 hours
Physics 1120 – 3 hours
Physics 2210 – 3 hours
Four additional Physics courses (12 semester hours) at the 2000 level or above.

Students intending to do a Minor in Physics are advised to take Mathematics 1910-1920 instead of 1120.

MINOR IN MEDICAL AND BIOLOGICAL PHYSICS
Students in the Minor Program in Medical and Biological Physics must complete a total of 21 semester hours of course credit, including these 4 core Physics courses:

General Physics for the Life Sciences:
Physics 1210 Physics for Life Sciences I or Physics 1110 General Physics I – 3 hours
Physics 1220 Physics for Life Sciences II or Physics 1120 General Physics II – 3 hours
Physics 2430 Physics of the Human Body – 3 hours

In addition, four electives (12 semester hours) must be chosen from the following suite of courses:

Foundations of Medical and Biological Physics:
Physics 2210 Modern Physics – 3 hours
Physics 2420 Introduction to Biomechanics – 3 hours
Physics 3420 Introduction to Medical Physics – 3 hours
Physics 3510 Advanced Biomechanics – 3 hours
Physics 3520 Biomedical Imaging – 3 hours
Physics 3910 Radiation Detection and Measurement – 3 hours
Biology 2260 Human Anatomy and Histology – 3 hours
Biology 4010 Human Physiology & Pathophysiology – 3 hours
RAD 2310 Radiographic Physics – 3 hours (available only to students in the Radiography program)

PHYSICS COURSES

1110 GENERAL PHYSICS I
This course emphasizes the fundamentals of mechanics and is intended as a first course in physics for, but not restricted to, students considering degrees in physics, chemistry, mathematics and computer science. Topics include vectors, kinematics, Newton’s laws of motion, gravitation, circular motion, static equilibrium, torque, momentum, conservation of energy and an introduction to special relativity.
PREREQUISITE: Proficiency in High School algebra, trigonometry and graphing is expected. Grade 12 Physics is highly recommended. It is required that Mathematics 1910 be taken at least concurrently.
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory or tutorial per week

1120 GENERAL PHYSICS II
This course is a continuation of Physics 1110 and is intended for, but not restricted to, students considering a degree in physics, chemistry, mathematics or computer science. Topics include fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, oscillations, wave motion, electricity, magnetism and optics.
PREREQUISITE: Physics 1110, and Mathematics 1910 or permission of the instructor. Mathematics 1920 must be taken at least concurrently
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory or tutorial per week
NOTE: Students may obtain credit for Physics 1220 or 1120 but not both.

1210 PHYSICS FOR LIFE SCIENCES I
This course is intended for life science and health science students. Students are introduced to the fundamental concepts of physics and some of their applications to biological systems. Topics include vectors, kinematics, force, energy and power, torque, linear and angular momentum, and fluid mechanics.
PREREQUISITE: Proficiency in High School algebra, trigonometry and graphing is expected. It is required that Mathematics 1120 or Mathematics 1910 be taken at least concurrently. High school physics is strongly recommended.
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory or tutorial per week
NOTE: Students may obtain credit in Physics 1210 or 1110, but not in both.

1220 PHYSICS FOR LIFE SCIENCES II
This course is a continuation of Physics 1210 intended for students in the life sciences, introducing additional physics concepts with emphasis on their application to biology. Topics include properties of waves, acoustics and hearing, optics and vision, thermodynamics, and basic electricity and magnetism.
PREREQUISITE: Physics 1210 or 1110 and either Mathematics 1120 or Mathematics 1910, or permission of the instructor.
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory or tutorial per week
NOTE: Students may obtain credit for Physics 1220 or 1120 but not both.

1510 LIFE IN THE UNIVERSE
Beginning with a history of the evolving scientific thought on Earth’s place in the universe, students will learn the fundamental physics and biology concepts necessary to assess what makes a planet and solar system suitable for life. Topics will include current research missions within our solar system, the search for extrasolar planets, the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, and the social implications of discovering life elsewhere. This course is intended for non-science students but science students are welcome to enrol also.
Three credit-hour lecture

2010 WAVES AND OSCILLATIONS
This course provides a basic introduction to the physics of mechanical waves. It begins with a study of the free, forced and damped harmonic oscillator and is followed by a study of discrete coupled oscillators in one dimension. This is used to derive the one-dimensional wave equation, which is used to study traveling and standing waves in continuous media. The course also provides an introduction to relevant mathematical concepts and methods, including complex numbers, partial derivatives, techniques for solving ordinary and partial differential equations, and Fourier series.
PREREQUISITE: Physics 1120 and Math 1920, or permission of the instructor
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week

2020 MECHANICS
Using a more advanced treatment than in the 1000-level physics courses, this course gives the student a deeper understanding of mechanics. Topics include: vector calculus and representations in different coordinate systems, oscillations, applications of Newtonian mechanics to generalized 3D motion of a particle, non-inertial reference systems, gravitation, and central forces.
PREREQUISITE: Physics 1120 and Mathematics 1920, or permission of the instructor
Three hours lecture per week

2030 (formerly 3820) COMPUTATIONAL PHYSICS
This course is designed to introduce students to basic computer-based techniques for modelling realistic physical systems. A variety of computational techniques are used to study a number of phenomena, including projectile motion, chaotic motion, planetary dynamics, electromagnetism,  and wave motion, and  to graphically visualize functions and data in 3D.
PREREQUISITE: Physics 2010 or 2020, Mathematics 2910, and Computer Science 1910
Three hours lecture per week

2120 ELECTRICITY, MAGNETISM, AND CIRCUITS
Topics include electric field and potential; magnetic field; electromagnetic induction; integral formulations of Gauss’ Law, Ampere’s Law and Faraday’s Law, direct-current and alternating-current circuits; resistance, capacitance, inductance and impedance; frequency response of AC circuits; and electrical measurements.
PREREQUISITE: Mathematics 2910 and Physics 2010 or Physics 2120; or permission of the instructor. Must be completed prior to taking this course.
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week

2210 MODERN PHYSICS
This course is a survey of the fundamental concepts of modern physics intended for both physics majors and other science majors. Topics include: relativity, photons and matter waves, the photoelectric effect, Compton scattering, the uncertainty principle, quantum tunnelling, the hydrogen atom, line spectra, orbital and spin angular momentum, magnetic dipole moments, x-rays, the laser, electron energy bands in solids, nuclear properties, radioactive decay, fission, fusion, quarks, leptons, and the Big Bang.
PREREQUISITE: Physics 1120 and Mathematics 1910, or permission of the instructor
Three hours lecture per week

2420 INTRODUCTION TO BIOMECHANICS
(See Kinesiology 3120)

2430 PHYSICS OF THE HUMAN BODY
This course provides students with an introduction to the physics of the human body. Physics concepts such as mechanics, energy, work, fluid statics and dynamics, sound, optics, electricity, and magnetism will be applied to better understand the functioning of the human body.
PREREQUISITE: Physics 1120 or Physics 1220. Otherwise, permission of the instructor is required. It is highly recommended that at least six semester hours of credit in Biology be completed prior to taking this course.
Three hours lecture per week

2610 ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT
This course is directed to both science and non-science students who wish to improve their understanding of this major technological issue. Topics include: the basic physics concepts necessary to understand the current and emerging renewable and non-renewable sources of energy, as well as their environmental and economic consequences.
PREREQUISITE:  Physics 1210 or Physics 1110 or permission of the instructor. (Proficiency in High School algebra, trigonometry and graphing is expected).
Three hours lecture (seminars and/or field visits to be arranged)

2630 ATMOSPHERIC AND OCEAN PHYSICS
The course is an introduction to fluid dynamics to describe atmospheric and ocean circulation, and interactions with the cryosphere; thermodynamics, cosmic and solar radiation and the global energy balance; physics and role of atmospheric aerosols and clouds in the climate system; instrumentation and measurement physics with a focus on temperature, humidity, pressure and solar radiation; computational physics and modeling of climate properties and processes. Field trips.
PREREQUISITES: Chemistry 1110, and Math 1120 or Math 1910
Semester hours of credit: 3

2820 MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS
This course is an introduction to some of the mathematical methods commonly used in the physical sciences and engineering, with an emphasis on applications in physics. Topics include: vector calculus in Cartesian and curvilinear coordinates, Cartesian tensors, an introduction to complex variables, Fourier series and Fourier transforms, ordinary and partial differential equations.
Cross-listed with Mathematics 2820.
PREREQUISITE: Math 2910 and either Physics 1120 or Physics 1220
Three hours lecture per week

2920 STARS, GALAXIES, AND THE UNIVERSE
This course is an introduction to the study of astronomical objects and phenomena. Topics of study include observation of Earth’s sky, gravity, light, and its use in astronomical instruments; properties and energy production of our Sun; methods of measuring astronomical distances; the structure, energy, and evolution of stars; interstellar matter and the structure of the Milky Way galaxy; other galaxies; cosmology; and some other related topics of interest.
Note: Credit will not be allowed for Physics 2920 if a student has already received credit for Physics 2510 or 2520.
PREREQUISITES: A first-year physics course or permission of the instructor.
Three-credit hour lecture; three-credit hour laboratory or field observations.

3010 ADVANCED MECHANICS
The Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations are presented as alternatives to the conventional treatment of Newton’s laws and are applied to classical problems such as harmonic and anharmonic oscillators, the two-body central force problem, and rigid body motion.
PREREQUISITE: Physics 2020 and Physics 2820 or Mathematics 3010
Three hours lecture per week

3120 ELECTROMAGNETISM I
This course develops fundamental concepts in electricity and magnetism. Topics include electric fields and potentials, capacitance, dielectric materials, magnetic fields, magnetic properties of materials, electromagnetic induction, inductance, Maxwell’s equations, and an introduction to electromagnetic waves.
PREREQUISITE: Physics 2120
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week

3220 QUANTUM PHYSICS I
This course introduces some of the fundamental methods of quantum mechanics. Topics include the postulates and mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics, the Dirac description of quantum mechanics, applications to a variety of one-dimensional problems such as quantum tunnelling, and the harmonic oscillator.
PREREQUISITE: Physics 2020, Physics 2210 and Mathematics 2910 or permission of the instructor
Three hours lecture per week

3330 (formerly 4410) EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS I
This intermediate laboratory course is a collection of prescribed experiments designed for developing core experimental skills and conducting laboratory work in the major areas of physics covered in other third-year physics courses. The course will also develop students’ knowledge of electronics and give them experience in scientific writing.
PREREQUISITE: Physics 3120, or permission of instructor
One hour lecture, six hours laboratory per week

3420 INTRODUCTION TO MEDICAL PHYSICS
This course provides students with an introduction to physics methods and methodology in medicine. Topics include: radiation sources and transport in tissues, radiation dosimetry and therapy, and applications of lasers and ultrasound in medicine.
PREREQUISITE: Biology 1310, and Physics 1120 or Physics 1220. Otherwise, permission of the instructor is required
Three hours lecture per week

3430 RESEARCH PROJECT
This course allows students majoring in Physics to participate in a research project. Students work under the supervision of a faculty member and are required to write a report describing the work, and give an oral presentation on the work.
PREREQUISITE: Completion of all required 2000-level courses for the Major in Physics. Entry into the course is contingent upon the student finding a faculty member willing to supervise the research and departmental approval of the research proposal.
Three semester hours

3510 ANALYSIS OF HUMAN MOVEMENT
(See Kinesiology 4810)

3520 BIOMEDICAL IMAGING
This course is an introduction to the physics of medical imaging for the four main modalities: x-ray, ultrasound, radionuclide, and magnetic resonance imaging. Basic concepts of light microscopy and image formation will also be included. The primary focus is on physical principles, instrumentation, image interpretation and application.
PREREQUISITE: Biology 1310, and Physics 1120 or Physics 1220, or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours per week

3610 SOLID STATE PHYSICS
This is an introductory course in Solid State Physics, which covers the basic physics of crystalline solids. Topics include: crystal structures; structure determination by x-ray diffraction; crystal bonding; lattice vibrations and phonons; the free and nearly-free electron models; and the energy band structures of metals, insulators and semiconductors.
PREREQUISITE: Physics 2210.  Physics 3220 and Physics 3720 taken at least concurrently or permission of the Department.
Three hours lecture per week

3630 INTRODUCTION TO ASTROPHYSICS AND COSMOLOGY
The first half of this course focuses on stellar structure and evolution, galaxy formation and evolution, and an overview of astrophysical processes generating high-energy photons (e.g. supernovae, gamma-ray bursts) and the radiation processes corresponding to high-energy electrons (such as synchrotron, bremsstrahlung, and Compton scattering). The second half of the course provides an introduction to cosmology (with a review of general relativity) and theory explaining the expanding universe, including topics such as: the cosmic microwave background, cosmic inflation, dark matter and dark energy.
PREREQUISITE:  Physics 2920
Three semester hours

3710 GENERAL RELATIVITY
This course provides an introduction to the field of general relativity. The course begins with a development of special relativity in tensor form and the introduction of the stress-energy tensor. Essential tensor calculus in relation to curved Riemannian manifolds is developed and the Einstein field equations are introduced. Applications include the structure of stars and black holes, planetary trajectories in strong gravitational fields, and gravitational waves.
PREREQUISITE: Physics 2020, Physics 2210 and Physics 2820
Three hours lecture per week

3720 STATISTICAL PHYSICS I
This course provides students with an introduction to the statistical description of macroscopic systems and focuses on both statistical and classical thermodynamics. Topics include the microcanonical and canonical ensembles, the perfect quantal and classical gas, black body radiation, the Einstein and Debye description of solids, and the laws of thermodynamics and some of their consequences and applications.
PREREQUISITE: Physics 1120 and Mathematics 2910, or permission of the instructor
Three hours lecture per week

3910 RADIATION DETECTION AND MEASUREMENT
This course provides students with an understanding of the theory and operation of radiation detectors. Topics include: radiation sources; the interaction of ionizing radiation with matter; the principles of operation and use of gas-filled, scintillation and semiconductor diode detectors; spectroscopy techniques and the use of related electronics; and shielding.
PREREQUISITE: Physics 2210 or Physics 2220 or permission of the instructor
Three hours lecture per week

4020 STATISTICAL PHYSICS II
This course builds upon the material presented in Statistical Physics I and covers the basic elements of equilibrium statistical mechanics. Topics include an introduction to the grand canonical ensemble, thermodynamic equilibrium, stability, fluctuations, phase transitions, quantum statistics, and interacting systems. A variety of applications to systems such as ideal gases, Bose gases, Fermi gases, and paramagnets is included.
PREREQUISITE: Physics 3220 and Physics 3720
Three hours lecture per week

4120 ELECTROMAGNETISM II
This is an advanced course covering classical electromagnetic theory based on Maxwell’s equations. Topics include: electro-statics, magnetostatics, solutions to boundary value problems, electric and magnetic properties of materials, electromagnetic wave propagation, electromagnetic radiation, and an introduction to relativistic electrodynamics.
PREREQUISITES: Physics 3120 and 2820
Three hours lecture per week

4140 OPTICS AND PHOTONICS
This course focuses on the fundamentals of optics and photonics with biomedical applications. Topics include energy flow in electromagnetic fields, reflection and transmission, interference and diffraction, optical properties of materials, dispersion and losses, waveguides, spectra and spectral line broadening, partially polarized radiation, lasers and modulators, crystal optics, detectors and couplers.
PREREQUISITE: Physics 2010, Physics 3120 and Physics 2820
Three hours lecture per week

4210 QUANTUM PHYSICS II
This course further develops the fundamental concepts and methodology of quantum mechanics. Topics include angular momentum, the hydrogen atom, spin, matrix mechanics, and time-independent and time-dependent perturbation theory.
PREREQUISITE: Physics 3220 and Physics 2820
Three hours lecture per week

4220 ADVANCED TOPICS IN QUANTUM PHYSICS
This is an advanced course in which important physical problems are solved using the basic methods of quantum mechanics. Topics include the quantum mechanics of atoms and molecules, scattering theory, and an introduction to relativistic quantum mechanics.
PREREQUISITE: Physics 4210
Three hours lecture per week

4430 EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS II
This advanced laboratory course introduces students to all phases of an experimental project, from design, planning, and setup of the apparatus, to detailed analysis and formal presentation of the results. Students select a small number of in-depth experiments with special emphasis on topics covered in the advanced physics courses.
PREREQUISITE: Physics 3330, Physics 3120 and Physics 3220 or permission of the instructor
One hour lecture, six hours laboratory per week

4610-4620 DIRECTED STUDIES
These courses are either reading courses, or research projects, which require the students to investigate a specific topic to a much greater depth than is possible in the department’s usual course offerings.
PREREQUISITE: Physics Majors with at least third-year standing, or permission of the department
Three semester hours of credit
(See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.)

4630-4640 SPECIAL TOPICS
These courses take advantage of unusual opportunities such as the availability of a visiting researcher to teach a course related to his/her field of expertise, or a course offer on an experimental basis, etc.
PREREQUISITE: Physics Majors with at least third-year standing, or permission of the department
Three semester hours of credit

4710 PARTICLE PHYSICS
This course provides an introduction to the field of particle physics. The course begins with a historical background of elementary particles, followed by a review of relativistic kinematics. A main focus of the course is the development of the Standard Model, including a detailed discussion of the electromagnetic, weak, and strong forces that govern particle interactions. Topics include: conservation laws; symmetries; particle decays, bound states, and scattering processes; and Feynman rules.
PREREQUISITE: Physics 3120 and Physics 3220
Three hours lecture per week
Semester hours of credit: 3

4900 ADVANCED RESEARCH AND THESIS
The objective of this course is to provide research experience for the student who intends to pursue further studies at the graduate level, or who is planning a career where research experience in Physics or related areas would be an asset. An independent research project is done under the supervision of a faculty advisor. The research results are reported in thesis format and are presented orally at a department seminar.
PREREQUISITE: Acceptance into the Honours Physics program
Twelve semester hours of credit

License

UPEI Calendar 2021-2022 Copyright © by University of Prince Edward Island. All Rights Reserved.

Share This Book