Undergraduate Academic Programs / Departments / Courses

56 Applied Human Sciences

Applied Human Sciences Faculty

Doris M. Anderson, Professor Emerita
Debbie MacLellan, Professor Emerita
Rebecca Reed-Jones, Associate Professor, Chair
Kathy Gottschall-Pass, Professor
Jennifer Taylor, Professor
William Montelpare, Professor
Adam Johnston, Associate Professor
Dany MacDonald, Associate Professor
Melissa Rossiter, Associate Professor
Travis Saunders, Associate Professor
Sarah Finch, Assistant Professor
Hiwot Haileslassie, Assistant Professor
Sarah Hewko, Assistant Professor
Michael MacLellan, Assistant Professor
Joseph Baker, Adjunct Professor
Sharon Compton, Adjunct Professor
Carolanne Nelson, Adjunct Professor
Leisha Strachan, Adjunct Professor
Carlos Zerpa, Adjunct Professor
Michael Zhang, Adjunct Professor

The mission of the Department of Applied Human Sciences is to promote the health and optimal development of individuals, families and communities by:

  • Preparing students to be leaders in their chosen discipline or profession
  • Generating new knowledge through outstanding scholarship
  • Forming strong links with the community and engaging in professional service

The overall aim of the Department is to provide a liberal university education which draws from a broad academic base: the biological, physical and social sciences; humanities; and professional studies. The curriculum reflects current scientific knowledge in Foods and Nutrition, Family Science, and Kinesiology, disciplines which are concerned with improving the life conditions of individuals, families, and communities.

DEGREE PROGRAMS

The Department of Applied Human Sciences offers several programs of study.

Family Science Programs/Certifications:
Bachelor of Science with a Major in Family Science
Bachelor of Child and Family Studies
Provisional Certified Family Life Educator (CFLE)
Minor in Family Science

Foods and Nutrition Programs:
Bachelor of Science with a Major in Foods and Nutrition
Bachelor of Science with an Honours in Foods and Nutrition
Minor in Foods and Nutrition
Integrated Dietetic Internship Program

Kinesiology
Bachelor of Science with a Major in Kinesiology

Family Science

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN FAMILY SCIENCE

Students following this degree program must complete 42 semester hours of required courses in Family Science and 9 additional semester hours of credit in Foods and Nutrition.

REQUIRED COURSES FOR THE FAMILY SCIENCE MAJOR

Family Science
1140 – Families in Contemporary Society
2210 – Family Resource Management
2410 – Human Development
2420 – Dynamics of Family Living
2610 – Communications
3310 – Introduction to Research Methods
3810 – Professional Practice with Children and Families
3820 – Program Planning and Evaluation
4110 – Field Placement I
4120 – Field Placement II
Four Family Science electives at the 2nd, 3rd, or 4th year level

Foods and Nutrition:
Foods and Nutrition 1110 – Introductory Foods
Foods and Nutrition 2110 – Introductory Nutrition I
Foods and Nutrition 2120 – Introductory Nutrition II

REQUIRED COURSES FROM OTHER DEPARTMENTS

Mathematics
1110 – Finite Mathematics

Statistics
1210 – Introductory Statistics

Chemistry
1110 – General Chemistry I
1120 – General Chemistry II

Biology
1220 – Human Physiology
1310 – Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology

UPEI courses and Writing Intensive Course
One of:
UPEI 1010 – Writing Studies – Engaging Writing, Rhetoric, and Communication,
UPEI 1020 – Inquiry Studies – Engaging Ideas and Cultural Contexts, OR
UPEI 1030 – University Studies – Engaging University Contexts and Experience
AND one writing intensive course

Social Sciences
Two 3-semester hour courses from Psychology, Sociology or Anthropology
Students are advised to consult with the Department Chair or their Faculty Advisor prior to registration.

COURSE SEQUENCE

Following is the usual sequence for completion of courses:

First Year
Foods and Nutrition 1110 – Introductory Foods
Family Science 1140 – Families in Contemporary Society
Biology 1310 – Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology
Chemistry 1110 – General Chemistry I
Chemistry 1120 – General Chemistry II
One of UPEI 1010, 1020 or 1030
Math 1110 – Finite Mathematics
Two Social Sciences
One free elective

Second Year
Foods and Nutrition 2110 – Introductory Nutrition I
Foods and Nutrition 2120 – Introductory Nutrition II
Family Science 2210 – Family Resource Management
Family Science 2410 – Human Development
Family Science 2420 – Dynamics of Family Living
Family Science 2610 – Communications
Statistics 1210 – Introductory Statistics
Biology 1220 – Human Physiology
Two free electives

Third Year
Family Science 3310 – Introduction to Research Methods
Family Science 3810 – Professional Practice with Children and Families
Family Science 3820 – Program Planning and Evaluation
Two Family Science electives
Five free electives

Fourth Year
Family Science 4110 – Field Placement I
Family Science 4120 – Field Placement II
Two Family Science electives
Six free electives

Child and Family Studies

Admission to this program has been suspended

The Bachelor of Child and Family Studies is a two-year post-diploma degree available to graduates of diploma programs in Early Childhood Education at Holland College or similar post-secondary institutions. Successful completion of a grade 12 math course (or an equivalent course) is strongly recommended. Students in the Bachelor of Child and Family Studies must complete a total of 60 semester hours at UPEI.

REQUIRED COURSES FOR THE CHILD AND FAMILY STUDIES DEGREE

Family Science 2210 – Family Resource Management
Family Science 2410 – Human Development
Family Science 2420 – Dynamics of Family Living
Family Science 2610 – Communications
Family Science 3310 – Introduction to Research Methods
Family Science 3810 – Professional Practice with Children and Families
Family Science 3820 – Program Planning and Evaluation
Family Science 4110 – Field Placement I
Family Science 4710 – Parent-Child Interaction
One Family Science elective at the 2000, 3000 or 4000 level
Math 1010 or 1110 – Elements of Mathematics or Finite Mathematics
Statistics 1210 – Introductory Statistics
One of UPEI 1010, 1020 or 1030
One writing intensive course
Six free electives

NOTES:

Suggested electives for those planning to apply to the Bachelor of Education Program at UPEI are found under the Admissions for Bachelor of Education.

COURSE SEQUENCE

First Year
Family Science 2210 – Family Resource Management
Family Science 2410 – Human Development
Family Science 2420 – Dynamics of Family Living
Family Science 2610 – Communications
Family Science 3810 – Professional Practice with Children and Families
Family Science 3820 – Program Planning and Evaluation
Math 1010 or 1110 – Elements of Mathematics or Finite Mathematics
Statistics 1210 – Introductory Statistics
One of UPEI 1010, 1020 or 1030 and a writing intensive course
One free elective

Second Year
Family Science 3310 – Introduction to Research Methods
Family Science 4110 – Field Placement I
Family Science 4710 – Parent-Child Interaction
One Family Science Elective at the 3000 or 4000 level
Six free electives

PROVISIONAL CERTIFICATION— NATIONAL COUNCIL ON FAMILY RELATIONS

The Department of Applied Human Sciences is approved by the National Council on Family Relations to offer the course work in order for graduates from the Family Science and Child and Family Studies programs to apply for provisional certification as a Certified Family Life Educator (CFLE). CFLEs work in a variety of health and social service positions. In particular, CLFEs are prepared to work with individuals and families in the areas of prevention and education. Students interested in becoming a CFLE need to ensure that they have completed all of the required course work for their major in addition to completing the following Family Science electives:

  • Family Science 3830 – Issues in Family Law and Social Policy
  • Family Science 4710 – Parent-Child Interaction
  • Family Science 4910 – Human Sexuality

FAMILY SCIENCE MINOR

Students in the Minor Program in Family Science must complete a total of 21 semester hours of Family Science. This consists of 9 semester hours of required core courses and 12 semester hours of Family Science electives.

Required:

  • Family Science 1140 – Families in Contemporary Society
  • Family Science 2210 – Family Resource Management
  • Family Science 2420 – Dynamics of Family Living
  • 12 additional hours of electives at the 2000, 3000 or 4000 level excluding:
  • Family Science 3310
  • Family Science 3810
  • Family Science 4110
  • Family Science 4120

Students intending to complete a Minor in Family Science are advised to consult with the Chair of the Department of Applied Human Sciences to ensure that they have the required course prerequisites. A student majoring in Foods and Nutrition is eligible to pursue the Family Science Minor.

Foods and Nutrition

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN FOODS & NUTRITION

Students following this degree program must complete 42 semester hours of required courses in Foods and Nutrition.

REQUIRED COURSES FOR FOODS AND NUTRITION MAJOR

Foods and Nutrition
1010 – Concepts and Controversies in Nutrition
2110 – Introductory Nutrition I
2120 – Introductory Nutrition II
2230 – Determinants of Dietary Behaviour
2610 – Communications
2810 – Introductory Foods
3020 – Advanced Foods
3310 – Introduction to Research Methods
3510 – Nutritional Assessment
3520 – Clinical Nutrition I
3820 – Program Planning & Evaluation
4120 – Human Metabolism
4340 – Community Nutrition
One Foods and Nutrition elective at the 3000 or 4000 level

REQUIRED COURSES FROM OTHER DEPARTMENTS

Mathematics
1110 – Finite Mathematics or 1120 Calculus for the Managerial, Social and Life Sciences

Statistics
1210 – Introductory Statistics

Chemistry
1110 – General Chemistry I
1120 – General Chemistry II
2430 – Organic Chemistry for the Life Sciences
3530 – Biochemistry

Biology
1220 – Human Physiology
1310 – Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology
2060 – Microbiology

Business
1710 – Organizational Behaviour

Social Sciences
Two 3 semester hour courses

UPEI courses and Writing Intensive Course
One of:
UPEI 1010 – Writing Studies – Engaging Writing, Rhetoric, and Communication,
UPEI 1020 – Inquiry Studies – Engaging Ideas and Cultural Contexts, OR
UPEI 1030 – University Studies – Engaging University Contexts and Experience AND one writing intensive course

COURSE SEQUENCE

Following is the usual sequence for completion of courses:

First Year
Foods and Nutrition 1010 – Concepts and Controversies in Nutrition
Biology 1220  – Human physiology
Biology 1310 – Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology
Chemistry 1110 – General Chemistry I
Chemistry 1120 – General Chemistry II
One of UPEI 1010, 1020 or 1030
Math 1110 – Finite Mathematics OR
Math 1120 – Calculus for the Managerial, Social and Life Sciences
Two 3 semester hours Social Science
1 free elective

Second Year
Foods and Nutrition 2110 – Introductory Nutrition I
Foods and Nutrition 2120 – Introductory Nutrition II
Foods and Nutrition 2230 – Determinants of Dietary Behaviour
Foods and Nutrition 2610 – Communications
Foods and Nutrition 2810 – Introductory Foods
Biology 2060 – Microbiology
Chemistry 2430 – Organic Chemistry for the Life Sciences
Statistics 1210 – Introductory Statistics
Business 1710 – Organizational Behaviour
One free elective

Third Year
Foods and Nutrition 3020 – Advanced Foods
Foods and Nutrition 3310 – Introduction to Research Methods
Foods and Nutrition 3510 – Nutritional Assessment
Foods and Nutrition 3520 – Clinical Nutrition I
Foods and Nutrition 3820 – Program Planning & Evaluation
Chemistry 3530 – Biochemistry
Four free electives

Fourth Year
Foods and Nutrition 4120 – Human Metabolism
Foods and Nutrition 4340 – Community Nutrition
One Foods and Nutrition elective at the 3000 or 4000 level
Six free electives

DIETETIC OPTION

In addition to the courses required for the Foods and Nutrition major, students interested in applying for dietetic internship must take Foods and Nutrition 3210 (Foodservice Systems Management), Foods and Nutrition 3710 (Lifespan Nutrition), Foods and Nutrition 3830 (Professional Practice in Dietetics), Foods and Nutrition 4220 (Quantity Food Production), Foods and Nutrition 4310 (Evidence-Based Practice in the Health Sciences), and Foods and Nutrition 4610 (Clinical Nutrition II).

COURSE SEQUENCE

Following is the usual sequence for completion of courses:

First Year
Foods and Nutrition 1010 – Concepts and Controversies in Nutrition
Biology 1220 – Human Physiology
Biology 1310 – Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology
Chemistry 1110 – General Chemistry I
Chemistry 1120 – General Chemistry II
One of UPEI 1010, 1020 or 1030
Math 1110 – Finite Mathematics OR Math 1120 – Calculus for the Managerial, Social and Life Sciences
Two 3 semester hours Social Science
One free elective

Second Year
Foods and Nutrition 2110 – Introductory Nutrition I
Foods and Nutrition 2120 – Introductory Nutrition II
Foods and Nutrition 2230 – Determinants of Dietary Behaviour
Foods and Nutrition 2610 – Communications
Foods and Nutrition 2810 – Introductory Foods
Biology 2060 – Microbiology
Chemistry 2430 – Organic Chemistry for the Life Sciences
Statistics 1210 – Introductory Statistics
Business 1710 – Organizational Behaviour
One free elective

Third Year
Foods and Nutrition 3020 – Advanced Foods
Foods and Nutrition 3210 – Foodservice Systems Management
Foods and Nutrition 3310 – Introduction to Research Methods
Foods and Nutrition 3510 – Nutritional Assessment
Foods and Nutrition 3520 – Clinical Nutrition I
Foods and Nutrition 3710 – Lifespan Nutrition
Foods and Nutrition 3820 – Program Planning & Evaluation
Foods and Nutrition 3830 – Professional Practice in Dietetics
Chemistry 3530 – Biochemistry
One free elective

Fourth Year
Foods and Nutrition 4120 – Human Metabolism
Foods and Nutrition 4220 – Quantity Food Production
Foods and Nutrition 4310 – Evidence-Based Practice in the Health Sciences
Foods and Nutrition 4340 – Community Nutrition
Foods and Nutrition 4610 – Clinical Nutrition II
Five free electives

Students in Foods and Nutrition may apply for admission to the optional Integrated Dietetic Internship Program. For more information about the program, see the Dietetic Internship program page.

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONOURS PROGRAM IN FOODS AND NUTRITION

The Honours program in Foods and Nutrition is designed to provide research experience at the undergraduate level within the BSc Program. It is available to students with a strong academic background who intend to continue studies at the post graduate level in Foods and Nutrition or related field, or to students who intend to pursue a career where research experience would be an asset.

The Honours program differs from the major in requiring a two-semester research course with thesis report for a total of 126 semester hours for the degree. The research component is to be completed within the BSc program and may require one summer (four months) preceding the graduating year. Evaluation of the research data and writing of the thesis would normally be done during the fall and/or spring session in Foods and Nutrition 4900: Advanced Research and Thesis. The following are the course requirements for the Honours program in Foods and Nutrition.

First Year
Foods and Nutrition 1010 – Concepts and Controversies in Nutrition
Chemistry 1110-1120 – General Chemistry I and II
Math 1110 OR 1120 – Finite Mathematics or Calculus for the Managerial, Social and Life Sciences
Biology 1220 – Human Physiology
Biology 1310 – Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology
One of UPEI 1010, 1020 or 1030
Two 3 semester hours Social Science
One free elective

Second Year
Foods and Nutrition 2110-2120 – Introductory Nutrition I and II
Foods and Nutrition 2230 – Determinants of Dietary Behaviour
Foods and Nutrition 2610 – Communications
Foods and Nutrition 2810 – Introductory Foods
Chemistry 2430 – Organic Chemistry for the Life Sciences
Biology 2060 – Microbiology
Statistics 1210 – Introductory Statistics
Business 1710 – Organizational Behaviour
One free elective

Third Year
Foods and Nutrition 3020 – Advanced Foods
Foods and Nutrition 3310 – Introduction in Research Methods
Foods and Nutrition 3510 – Nutritional Assessment
Foods and Nutrition 3520 – Clinical Nutrition I
Foods and Nutrition 3820 – Program Planning and Evaluation
Chemistry 3530 – Biochemistry
Four free electives

Fourth Year
Foods and Nutrition 4120 – Human Metabolism
Foods and Nutrition 4340 – Community Nutrition
Foods and Nutrition 4900 – Advanced Research and Thesis
One Foods and Nutrition electives at the 3000 or 4000 level
Four free electives

NOTE: Honours students are advised to take an advanced statistics course and consult with their advisor for assistance in choosing electives that will support their research projects.

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS

For admission to the Honours program, students must have a minimum GPA of 3.0 in all Foods and Nutrition courses combined and a CGPA of 2.7 in all previous courses. Permission of the Department is also required and is contingent on the student finding an advisor and on acceptance of the research project by the Department of Applied Human Sciences. Students interested in completing an honours should consult with the Department Chair as early as possible and not later than March 31st of the student’s third year.

To graduate with Honours in Foods and Nutrition, students must maintain a GPA of 3.0 in all Foods and Nutrition courses combined and a CGPA of 2.7.

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN FOODS AND NUTRITION

Students in the Minor Program in Foods and Nutrition must complete a total of 21 semester hours of credit in Foods and Nutrition.

These consist of 12 semester hours of required core courses as follows:

  • Foods and Nutrition 1010 – Concepts and Controversies in Nutrition
  • Foods and Nutrition 2110 – Introductory Nutrition I
  • Foods and Nutrition 2120 – Introductory Nutrition II
  • Foods and Nutrition 2810 – Introductory Foods

Nine additional hours of electives must be chosen at the 2000, 3000 or 4000 level. Students intending to do a Minor in Foods and Nutrition are advised to consult with the Chair of the Department of Applied Human Sciences to ensure that they have the required course prerequisites.

Kinesiology

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN KINESIOLOGY

Students following this degree program must complete 57 semester hours of required courses in Kinesiology and 6 semester hours of required courses in Foods and Nutrition, and 6 semester hours of courses in humanities. Students are advised to consult with the Department Chair or their Faculty Advisor prior to registration.

REQUIRED COURSES FOR THE KINESIOLOGY MAJOR

Kinesiology courses
1010 – Introduction to Kinesiology
2020 – Introduction to Sport and Exercise Psychology
2210 – Introduction to Exercise Physiology
2320 – Introduction to Motor Learning and Control
2510 – Anatomical Kinesiology
3120 – Introduction to Biomechanics
3310 – Introduction to Research Methods
3410 – Human Motor Development
3430 – Physiological Assessment and Training
3820 – Program Planning and Evaluation
4810 – Analysis of Human Movement
Eight Kinesiology electives at the 3000 or 4000 level

Foods and Nutrition
2110 – Introductory Nutrition I
2120 – Introductory Nutrition II

REQUIRED COURSES FROM OTHER DEPARTMENTS

Mathematics
1120 – Calculus for the Managerial, Social and Life Sciences

Statistics
1210 – Introductory Statistics

Chemistry
1110 – General Chemistry I
1120 – General Chemistry II

Physics
1210 – Physics for Life Sciences I

Biology
1210 – Human Anatomy
1220 – Human Physiology
1310 – Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology

UPEI courses and Writing Intensive Course
One of:
UPEI 1010 – Writing Studies – Engaging Writing, Rhetoric, and Communication,
UPEI 1020 – Inquiry Studies – Engaging Ideas and Cultural Contexts, OR
UPEI 1030 – University Studies – Engaging University Contexts and Experience AND One writing intensive course

Psychology
1010-1020 – Introductory Psychology I and II
Students are advised to consult with the Department Chair or their Faculty Advisor prior to registration.

COURSE SEQUENCE

Following is the usual sequence for completion of courses

Year One

Kinesiology 1010 – Introduction to Kinesiology
Biology 1210 – Human Anatomy
Biology 1220 – Human Physiology
Chemistry 1110 – General Chemistry I
Chemistry 1120 – General Chemistry II
One of UPEI 1010, 1020 or 1030
Math 1120 – Calculus for the Managerial, Social and Life Sciences
Psychology 1010 – Introductory Psychology I
Psychology 1020 – Introductory Psychology II
One free elective

Year Two

Kinesiology 2020 – Introduction to Sport and Exercise Psychology
Kinesiology 2210 – Introduction to Exercise Physiology
Kinesiology 2320 – Introduction to Motor Learning and Control
Kinesiology 2510 – Anatomical Kinesiology
Foods and Nutrition 2110 – Introductory Nutrition I
Foods and Nutrition 2120 – Introductory Nutrition II
Biology 1310 – Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology
Statistics 1210 – Introductory Statistics
Physics 1210 – Physics for Life Sciences I
One free elective

Year Three

Kinesiology 3120 – Introduction to Biomechanics
Kinesiology 3310 – Introduction to Research Methods
Kinesiology 3410 – Human Motor Development
Kinesiology 3430 – Physiological Assessment and Training
Kinesiology 3820 – Program Planning and Evaluation
Two Kinesiology electives at the 3000 or 4000 level
One Humanities elective
Two free electives

Year Four

Kinesiology 4810 – Analysis of Human Movement
Six Kinesiology electives at the 3000 or 4000 level
One Humanities elective
Two free electives

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONOURS PROGRAM IN KINESIOLOGY

The Honours program in Kinesiology is designed to provide research experience at the undergraduate level within the BSc Program. It is available to students with a strong academic background who intend to continue studies at the post graduate level in Kinesiology or related field, or to students who intend to pursue a career where research experience would be an asset.

The Honours program differs from the major in requiring a two-semester research course with thesis report for a total of 126 semester hours for the degree. The research component is to be completed within the BSc program through completion of Kinesiology 4900: Advanced Research and Thesis.

The following are the course requirements for the Honours program in Kinesiology.

Year One
Kinesiology 1010  – Introduction to Kinesiology
Biology 1210  – Human Anatomy
Biology 1220  – Human Physiology
Chemistry 1110  – General Chemistry I
Chemistry 1120  – General Chemistry II
One of UPEI 1010, 1020 or 1030
Math 1120 – Calculus for the Managerial, Social and Life Sciences
Psychology 1010  – Introductory Psychology I
Psychology 1020 – Introductory Psychology II
One free elective

Year Two
Kinesiology 2020  – Introduction to Sport and Exercise Psychology
Kinesiology 2210  – Introduction to Exercise Physiology
Kinesiology 2320  – Introduction to Motor Learning and Control
Kinesiology 2510  – Anatomical Kinesiology
Foods and Nutrition 2110  – Introductory Nutrition I
Foods and Nutrition 2120  – Introductory Nutrition II
Biology 1310  – Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology
Statistics 1210  – Introductory Statistics
Physics 1210  – Physics for Life Sciences I
One free elective

Year Three
Kinesiology 3120 – Introduction to Biomechanics
Kinesiology 3310 – Introduction to Research Methods
Kinesiology 3410 – Human Motor Development
Kinesiology 3430 – Physiological Assessment and Training
Kinesiology 3820 – Program Planning and Evaluation
Two Kinesiology electives at the 3000 or 4000 level
One Humanities elective
Two free electives

Year Four
Kinesiology 4810 – Analysis of Human Movement
Kinesiology 4900 – Advanced Research and Thesis
Six Kinesiology electives at the 3000 or 4000 level
One Humanities elective

NOTE: Honours students are advised to consult with their advisor for assistance in choosing electives that will support their research project.

Entrance Requirements
For admission to the Honours program, students must have a minimum GPA of 3.0 in all Kinesiology courses combined and an overall GPA of 2.7 in all previous courses. Permission of the Department is also required and is contingent on the student finding an advisor and on acceptance of the research project by the Department of Applied Human Sciences. Students interested in completing the honours program should consult with the Department Chair as early as possible, no later than March 31st of the student’s third year.

To graduate with Honours in Kinesiology, students must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0 in all Kinesiology courses combined and an overall GPA of 2.7.

QUALIFICATION FOR PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATION
Graduates of our Kinesiology program are eligible to apply for many certifications after graduation. Depending on the desired certifications, students may need to take certain elective courses beyond the core curriculum of the program. Additionally, most certifications require an entrance exam and volunteer hours prior to becoming certified. Students are encouraged to review certification requirements early in their degree so they are able to plan their education and volunteer hours accordingly. Below is a list of popular certifications, although this list is not exhaustive.

Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology (CSEP):
Certified Personal Trainer (CSEP-CPT) and Certified  Exercise Physiologist (CSEP-CEP)

College of Kinesiologists of Ontario
Health and Fitness Federation of Canada:
Certified Personal Trainer (HFFC-CPT) and Certified Exercise Physiologist (HFFC-CEP)

National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA):
Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS)

CO-OP EDUCATION IN APPLIED HUMAN SCIENCES

The UPEI Co-op Program is an integrated approach to university education which enables students to alternate academic terms on campus with work terms in suitable employment. The success of such programs is founded on the principle that students are able to apply theoretical knowledge from course studies in the workplace and return to the classroom with practical workplace experience. Students who successfully complete all the requirements of the program will have the notation entered on their transcripts and on the graduation parchment.

Students accepted into the program complete at least three paid work terms of normally 14 weeks duration, and three professional development courses. Credits earned through completion of work terms are counted as general electives.

The Co-op option is available to full-time students in the Foods and Nutrition program (excluding dietetic option). Applications to the Co-op Education Program are normally made after completion of the first year of study.

See the Co-operative Education Program section of the UPEI Academic Calendar for more information.

Integrated Dietetic Internship Program

This dietetic education program is an accredited program recognized by the Partnership for Dietetic Education and Practice (PDEP).

Students majoring in Foods and Nutrition may apply for admission to the optional Integrated Dietetic Internship Program. The integrated approach to professional training enables students to build upon and apply theoretical knowledge gained from their academic program. On successful completion of the Program, students will have fulfilled the competencies required to reach entry-level professional dietetic competence as determined by the PDEP, and will be eligible to apply for admission to the dietetics profession.

Internship levels and their results will be recorded on students’ transcripts. Upon successful completion of both the accredited degree program and the required internship levels, students will be granted a university certificate attesting to their successful completion of the Integrated Dietetic Internship Program.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

All students majoring in Foods and Nutrition who have achieved a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 with no Foods and Nutrition course below a GPA of 2.7, and have completed the following required courses will be eligible to apply for the program:

Foods & Nutrition 1010 – Concepts and Controversies in Nutrition
Foods & Nutrition 2110 – Introductory Nutrition I
Foods & Nutrition 2120 – Introductory Nutrition II
Foods & Nutrition 2230 – Determinants of Dietary Behaviour
Foods & Nutrition 2810 – Introductory Foods
Foods & Nutrition 3210 – Food Service Management
Foods & Nutrition 3310 – Research Methods
Foods & Nutrition 3510 – Nutritional Assessment
Foods & Nutrition 3830 – Professional Practice in Dietetics
Chemistry 1110 – General Chemistry I
Chemistry 1120 – General Chemistry II
Chemistry 2430 – Organic Chemistry
Biology 1220 – Human Physiology
Biology 1310 – Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology

Interested candidates are encouraged to consult the Director of Internship early in their program to discuss admission and course scheduling. Students interested in pursuing this option are also encouraged to seek relevant paid or unpaid work experience in the summer preceding application. A formal application for admission to the Integrated Dietetic Internship Program is required. Application forms are available from the department.

A selection panel will determine student admissibility based upon academic performance, paid and unpaid work experience, motivation and personal suitability. Students meeting the admission criteria will be ranked and the top candidates will be interviewed. By the first week of February, the Professional Practice Coordinator Dietetics will notify, in writing, all students interviewed as to the outcome of the process.

Students accepted into the dietetic internship program must show evidence of all immunizations being up to date prior entering the program. As well, each student will be required to show proof of a completed criminal record check prior to the start date.

CONTINUANCE REQUIREMENTS

Once admitted to the program, students must continue in full-time enrolment between internship courses. An academic review of students’ performance will take place at the end of each semester. Students are required to maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.0 with no Foods and Nutrition course below a GPA of 2.7. Students who fail to meet these standards or who fail a required course(s) will not be permitted to begin the next internship course until standards are met.

Internship students must complete all of the regular requirements for a Bachelor of Science (Foods and Nutrition) degree. Foods and Nutrition 3210 (Food Service Systems Management), Foods and Nutrition 3710 (Lifespan Nutrition), Foods and Nutrition 3830 (Professional Practice in Dietetics), Foods and Nutrition 4220 (Quantity Food Production), Foods and Nutrition 4310 (Evidence Based Practice in the Health Sciences), and Foods and Nutrition 4610 (Clinical Nutrition II) must be included within their degree program.

In addition to the above requirements, students must successfully complete three internship courses.

INTERNSHIP SCHEDULE

Students must complete three internship courses in the Integrated Dietetic Internship Program. The first internship course FN-3001 is scheduled in the spring and summer months between the third and fourth academic years. The second and third internship courses FN-4001 and FN-4002 are completed following fourth year. The first internship course will include a one week professional practice course, followed by an eight week placement, for a total of 9 weeks. This will be followed by second and third internship courses of no less then 26 weeks, for a total of at least 35 weeks.  Placements may be extended if an intern has not completed all competencies.

Satisfactory fulfilment of the Integrated Dietetic Internship courses requires:

1. A satisfactory evaluation from the Preceptor at the placement site.

2. Completion of the minimum number of required competencies as indicated on the appropriate evaluation form.

WITHDRAWAL CONDITIONS

Students will be required to withdraw from the Integrated Dietetic Internship Program if:

1. They are dismissed from, resign, or fail to achieve the required competencies during the program, or

2. They do not achieve a passing grade in required courses or do not maintain the standards for nutrition courses and overall GPA necessary for continuance in the Integrated Dietetic Internship Program, or

3. They fail to abide by the policies and procedures set out by the Advisory Committee for the Integrated Dietetic Internship Program and/or those of the placement organization.

Students who voluntarily withdraw from or who are required to withdraw from the Integrated Dietetic Internship Program may remain in and continue with the regular Foods and Nutrition majors program.

REGISTRATION AND FEES

Students are required to register for all three internship courses (FN-3001, 4001, 4002) according to normal registration procedures. Internship courses will officially be designated on students’ transcripts as pass or fail. Students pay for their internship courses as they are taken. Students accepted to the Integrated Dietetic Internship Program are required to pay an Internship Fee (see Calendar section on fees). This amount is to be paid to the Accounting Office prior to the start date for the specified internship course.

Additional information on policies and procedures related to the Integrated Dietetic Internship Program are available from the Department.

Dieticians of Canada Graduate Internship

The Foods & Nutrition program is an accredited program recognized by the Partnership for Dietetic Education and Practice (PDEP) and prepares students for eligibility to apply for a graduate internship.

To apply for a position in an accredited graduate dietetic internship program, students must meet the academic requirements established by PDEP and should have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 in their last 30 courses. In addition to the courses required for the Foods and Nutrition major, students interested in applying for a graduate dietetic internship placement must take Foods and Nutrition 3210, Foods and Nutrition 3830, Foods and Nutrition 4220, Foods and Nutrition 4310, and Foods and Nutrition 4610.

Students should consult with the Director of Internship for details and counselling by the end of second year.

NOTES REGARDING 1000-LEVEL FAMILY SCIENCE AND FOODS AND NUTRITION

Foods and Nutrition 1110 and Family Science 1140 are introductory courses required for, but not restricted to, Foods and Nutrition and Family Science majors. A grade of at least 60% in Foods and Nutrition 1110 and Family Science 1140 is a prerequisite for all Foods and Nutrition and Family Science courses above the 1000 level. However, this course prerequisite may be waived with the permission of the Chair for individual courses.

Foods and Nutrition 1010 is a course designed primarily for non-Foods and Nutrition or Family Science majors who will not be taking advanced courses in Nutrition; however it will be accepted for credit as an elective in the Foods and Nutrition or Family Science majors programs. Credit will NOT be allowed for Foods and Nutrition 1010 if completed after Foods and Nutrition 2110.

FAMILY SCIENCE COURSES

1140 FAMILIES IN CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY
This course is an introduction to the study of families and contemporary issues facing today’s families. Topics include changing family structures, current trends in Canadian families, the interaction of families with other systems, and theories used to study families. The course also includes an introduction to family life education including the philosophy, nature and purpose of family education.
Three lecture hours
Note: Bachelor of Child and Family Studies students are not able to credit Family Science 1140 as an elective.

2210 FAMILY RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
This course is a study of the management process and how it relates to decision making and resource use by individuals and families. Topics include management history and theories; values and goals; resources; planning and decision making. The management of stress and fatigue, time, finances and environmental resources are also discussed. Students gain experience in the application of theory to a variety of individual and family managerial situations.
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 1140 or a student in the Bachelor of Child and Family Studies
Three lecture hours

2410 HUMAN DEVELOPMENT
This course explores human development from conception to old age, including physical, cognitive, and psychological aspects. Topics include attachment across the lifespan; various theories used to study human development; gender; the aging process; and societal factors affecting human development. The reciprocal relationship between human development and their environments is emphasized.
Cross-listed with Kinesiology 2410.
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 1140, a student in the Bachelor of Child and Family Studies or Kinesiology 1010 and admission to BSc Kinesiology program
Three lecture hours
NOTE: Credit will not be allowed for Family Science/Kinesiology 2410 if a student has already received credit for Psychology 2010

2420 DYNAMICS OF FAMILY LIVING
This course examines the multiple realities of living in families. Using current theory and research in family science, it focuses on family diversity extending across history, gender, nationality, culture, and age. The course covers crucial issues such as family stress, later-life families, family violence, the work-family interface, parenting, and other areas of family living. The effects of legislation, and social economics and technical change on families are discussed.
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 1140 or registration in the Child and Family Studies Program
Three lecture hours

2430 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY
(See Psychology 2420).

2440 PHILOSOPHIES OF LOVE AND SEXUALITY
(See Philosophy 2420).

2610 COMMUNICATIONS
This course is an introduction to the basic principles of communication. The course balances communication theory and research with skills acquisition and practice to help students communicate more effectively in a variety of professional settings. Students are provided with an opportunity to develop skills in interpersonal and group communication, public speaking, and interviewing.
Cross-listed with Foods and Nutrition 2610 and Kinesiology 3610.
PREREQUISITE: Student admitted to Foods and Nutrition, or Radiography, or Kinesiology OR granted permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours and 3 hour laboratory

3050 ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT AND ADJUSTMENT
(See Psychology 3050).

3080 CHILD DEVELOPMENT
(See Psychology 3080).

3100 ADULT DEVELOPMENT
(See Psychology 3090).

3090 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Family Science at the 3000 level.

3310 INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH METHODS

This course is an introduction to research intended to enable students to read critically and evaluate current research. Students are introduced to various types of research designs, research terminology, and the components of the research process.
Cross-listed with Foods and Nutrition/Kinesiology 3310.
PREREQUISITE: Statistics 1210. Preference for admission will be given to students registered in the Family Science, Foods and Nutrition, Child and Family Studies, Kinesiology or Radiography programs
Three lecture hours

3440 INTIMATE RELATIONSHIPS
(See Psychology 3420).

3540 KINSHIP AND FAMILY
(See Anthropology 3520).

3530 PROGRAMS AND SERVICES FOR OLDER ADULTS AND CAREGIVERS
This course is an examination of the diverse array of programs and services designed for older adults, and caregivers of older adults, from a legislative, consumer, and provider perspective. Students will gain insight into these programs and services including their place in the array of services for older adults and the implications of such programs and services for older adults, caregivers, and society.
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 1140
Three lecture hours

3610 CURRENT ISSUES IN CHILDREN’S HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENT
This course is an advanced study of current issues and research in children’s health and development in a family context. Emphasis is placed on the promotion of healthy behaviours and development of children by exploring the linkages between research, policy, and practice.
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 2410 or permission of the instructor

3620 FAMILY VIOLENCE
This course will examine the history and various definitions and theories used in investigating the problem of family violence across the life span (i.e. children in abusive families, dating violence, intimate partner violence, the abuse of older adults). Emphasis will be placed on violence against women and violence in diverse family forms. A particular emphasis will be placed on examining strategies for the prevention of family violence over the life course.
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 2420 or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours

3810 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE WITH CHILDREN AND FAMILIES
This course is designed to inform students of the range of professional practice issues confronted by helping professionals working with children, youth, adults and their families. The complexities of working with diverse populations with regard to professional ethics, standards of practice and advocacy are examined. Additional topics include: managing the field placement experience, professional roles, peer learning, reflective practice and portfolio development. Students gain experience in areas of professional practice with children, youth, adults of all ages, and their families through a field placement experience.
PREREQUISITE: Third year standing in Family Science or Child and Family Studies
Three lecture hours for first 4 weeks; for balance of semester, 1 lecture hour per week and 32 hours field placement.

3820 PROGRAM PLANNING AND EVALUATION
In this course, students develop competency in planning, implementing, and evaluating programs for health promotion and family education. Topics include theories and models commonly used for program planning and behaviour change, assessing needs, selecting appropriate intervention strategies, identification and allocation of resources, the marketing process, and evaluation models and design.
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 3810 or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours per week and the development, implementation and evaluation of a program.

3830 ISSUES IN FAMILY LAW AND SOCIAL POLICY
This course is a study of how public policy shapes the context in which families live, and, in turn, influences human and family development. Topics include the relationship between family functioning and public policies at the local, provincial, and federal levels; the influence of demographic changes, values, attitudes, and perceptions of the well-being of children and families on public policy debates; the effectiveness of policies and programs from a family perspective; the policy making process; and the different roles professionals play in influencing policy development. Special attention is given to the consequences of various policies on current family issues.
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 2420 or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours

3840 WOMEN, ECONOMICS AND THE ECONOMY
(See Economics 3810).

3950 GENDER AND VIOLENCE
(See Psychology 3950).

4090 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Family Science at the 4000 level.

4110 FIELD PLACEMENT I
This course provides an opportunity for students to integrate theory into practice through practical use of the knowledge and skills acquired in the classroom. Students participate in service provision at a community agency where they will test their attitudes and abilities to work with people, grow in self- awareness, as well as learn and develop helping and administrative skills. Through observation, practice, and reflection, students study and write about family science and professional practice issues relevant to their field placement.
PREREQUISITES: Family Science 3810, 3820 and fourth year standing in Family Science or Child and Family Studies.
Two lecture hours per week and 80 hours of field placement

4120 FIELD PLACEMENT II
This course is a continuation of Family Science 4110 and provides an opportunity for students to integrate theory into practice through practical use of the knowledge and skills acquired in the classroom. Students participate in service provision at a community agency where they will test their attitudes and abilities to work with people, grow in self-awareness, as well as learn and develop helping and administrative skills. Through observation, practice, and reflection, students study and write about family science and professional practice issues relevant to their field placement.
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 4110
Two lecture hours per week and 80 hours of field placement

4310 EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE IN THE HEALTH SCIENCES
(See Foods & Nutrition 4310).

4400 SENIOR UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH PROJECT
This course allows senior students majoring in Family Science to carry out a full-year research project under the supervision of a faculty member. Entry to this course is contingent upon the student finding a departmental faculty member willing to supervise the research and permission of the department.
PREREQUISITE: Fourth year standing in the Family Science or Child and Family Studies programs
Six semester hours of credit

4410/4420 DIRECTED STUDIES IN FAMILY SCIENCE
(See Academic Regulation 9 for Regulations Governing Directed Studies.)

4510 WOMEN AND AGING
This course examines older women’s diverse experiences in today’s families and in the world as homemakers, wives/partners, mothers, caregivers, and as paid and unpaid workers. Family studies scholarship is examined critically for various themes such as the social construction of gender and validation of family diversity. The contradictory nature of the family as source of venue for control and oppression versus support, validation, and empowerment is also explored.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies 4510.
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 2420 or at least one introductory Diversity and Social Justice Studies course
Three lecture hours

4710 PARENT-CHILD INTERACTION
This course is a study of the developmental nature of parenting throughout the life cycle from birth through aging, with emphasis on the reciprocal nature of parent-child interactions. It includes parenting in various family structures, in various lifestyles, in high-risk families, in families with exceptional children, and in families from diverse cultures. Alternative approaches to parenting (e.g. adoption and assisted reproduction) are discussed. Contemporary strategies for parent guidance and education are introduced.
PREREQUISITE: Family Science/Kinesiology 2410
Three lecture hours

4910 HUMAN SEXUALITY
This course is an examination of the psychological, social, and physiological aspects of sexual development throughout life. Aspects of human sexuality including reproduction, influence on relationships, gender issues, sexual orientation, sexually transmitted diseases, sexual values and decision-making are covered. Students examine current sexuality education methodologies. Implications for future trends in human interaction are analyzed.
PREREQUISITE: Family Science 2420 or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours

FOODS AND NUTRITION COURSES

1010 CONCEPTS AND CONTROVERSIES IN NUTRITION
This course introduces students to the science of nutrition through an exploration of contemporary issues relevant to nutrition and health. Emphasis will be placed on health promotion and disease prevention using an evidence-based approach to understand and evaluate current nutrition controversies.
Three lecture hours

1020 NUTRITION FOR NURSING PRACTICE
This course is an introduction to the science of nutrition specifically designed for nursing students. Topics discussed include: the nutrients, role of these nutrients in chronic disease prevention, diet therapy for specific disease conditions, nutritional needs across the lifespan and the selection of a healthy diet.
PREREQUISITE: Biology 1210
COREQUISITE: Biology 1220
Three lecture hours
NOTE: Credit will NOT be allowed for F-N 1020 if a student has already received credit for F-N 1010.

2110 INTRODUCTORY NUTRITION I
This course is a study of applied human nutrition with a focus on carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and select micronutrients; requirements and food sources of these nutrients and their role in chronic disease prevention; digestion, absorption and metabolism; and assessment of nutritional status.
PREREQUISITE: Chemistry 1120, or permission of instructor
Three lecture hours

2120 INTRODUCTORY NUTRITION II
This course is a continuation of FN 2110 with a focus on water, major minerals and trace minerals; requirements and food sources of these nutrients; role of these nutrients in chronic disease prevention; nutritional needs across the lifespan, and the selection of an adequate diet.
PREREQUISITE: Foods and Nutrition 2110 or permission of instructor
Three lecture hours

2230 DETERMINANTS OF DIETARY BEHAVIOUR
This course studies the factors influencing human dietary behaviour and ultimately nutritional health. Topics include the food system, development of food preferences, food and culture, school food issues, food insecurity, food and the media, and sensory influences on dietary behaviour.
PREREQUISITES: Foods and Nutrition 1010 or 2110 or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours

2310 FOOD AND CULTURAL STUDIES
(See Diversity and Social Justice Studies 2120)

2610 COMMUNICATIONS
(See Family Science 2610/Kinesiology 3610)

2810 INTRODUCTORY FOODS
This course is a study of the physical, chemical, and nutritive properties of food; the changes that occur during food preparation, storage, and handling; the factors affecting food acceptability and quality.
Three lecture hours, three-hour laboratory
Restricted to Foods and Nutrition Major or Minor students.

3001 INTEGRATED DIETETIC PRACTICE I
This course introduces students to dietetic practice, and provides opportunities for students to integrate theory and practice. Students complete one week of classroom experience followed by two separate work practica for a total of 9 weeks experience in select dietetic practice settings.
PREREQUISITES: FN 3210, 3520, 3820, 3830, Admission to the UPEI Integrated Dietetic Internship Program
Three lecture hours

3020 ADVANCED FOODS
This course is an advanced study of the physical, chemical, and biological properties of foods through food experimentation; objective and subjective testing of food attributes with emphasis on sensory analysis; and principles of research methodology as applied to foods. Current trends are discussed. A product development project is required.
PREREQUISITES: Chemistry 1120, Foods and Nutrition 1110, and Foods and Nutrition/Family Science 3310 or permission of instructor
Three lecture hours, three-hour laboratory

3090 SPECIAL TOPICS
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Foods and Nutrition at the 3000 level.

3210 FOOD SERVICE SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT
This course is a study of food service management with emphasis on concepts and theories of organizational behaviour; safety, sanitation and hygienic practices in food service; quality and cost control; personnel management, staffing, physical design and delivery systems and the process of management in an institutional setting and in other food service operations. Other topics include menu planning, marketing, management information systems, budgeting, and the role of computers in food service management.
PREREQUISITE: Foods and Nutrition 1110 or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours

3310 INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH METHODS
(See Family Science/Kinesiology 3310)

3510 NUTRITIONAL ASSESSMENT
This course is an advanced study of current issues in nutrition assessment. Topics include dietary, anthropometric, laboratory and clinical methods currently in use to assess nutritional status at the population and individual level; challenges in interpreting nutritional assessment data; and nutrition counselling.
PREREQUISITES: Foods and Nutrition 2120 or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours

3520 CLINICAL NUTRITION I
This course introduces the nutrition care process and the fundamentals of the pathophysiology andnutritional management of chronic diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and disorders of energy balance. Monitoring of nutritional status, the development, implementation, and evaluation of nutrition careplans, medical terminology and drug-nutrient interactions are also discussed.
PREREQUISITE: Foods and Nutrition 3510 and Biology 1220
Three lecture hours

3710 LIFESPAN NUTRITION
This course builds on Introductory Nutrition by exploring in depth the nutritional foundations necessary for growth, development, normal functioning, and disease prevention at various stages of the life cycle. The impact of nutritional deficiencies and excesses on the body at various life stages will also be studied.
PREREQUISITES: Foods and Nutrition 1010 or 1020 or 2110, or permission of the instructor
Three semester hours

3750 NUTRITION FOR FITNESS & SPORT
(See Kinesiology 3750)

3820 PROGRAM PLANNING AND EVALUATION
In this course, students develop competency in planning, implementing, and evaluating programs for health promotion and family education. Topics include theories and models commonly used for program planning and behaviour change, assessing needs, selecting appropriate intervention strategies, identification and allocation of resources, the marketing process, and evaluation models and design.
Cross-listed with Kinesiology 3820.
PREREQUISITES:  Foods and Nutrition 2120 or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours and the development, implementation and evaluation of a program.

3830 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE IN DIETETICS
This course is designed to prepare students for a career in dietetic practice. Students will be introduced to the Integrated Competencies for Dietetic Education and Practice (ICDEP) and develop a professional portfolio which will demonstrate achievement of professional competencies. Topics include: career planning, federal/provincial/territorial requirements for dietetic practice, reflective practice, professional ethics, standards of practice, and professional boundaries.
PREREQUISITE: Students must be a third year Foods and Nutrition major intending to enter the field of dietetics
Three lecture hours

4001 INTEGRATED DIETETIC PRACTICE II
Students continue to synthesize their knowledge, skills, and professional competence in dietetic practice settings. Emphasis is on more complex dietetic practice. Students complete 14-16 weeks full-time experience in select dietetic practice settings.
PREREQUISITE:  FN 3001
Three lecture hours

4002 INTEGRATED DIETETIC PRACTICE III
This course is a continuation of FN 4001, and may involve supervised staff relief. Students complete 12-14 weeks full-time experience in select dietetic practice settings.
PREREQUISITE:  FN 4001
Three lecture hours

4010 ETHICAL ISSUES IN FITNESS & HEALTH
(See Kinesiology 3510)

4090 SPECIAL TOPIC
Creation of a course code for special topics offered by Foods and Nutrition at the 4000 level.

4120 HUMAN METABOLISM
This course is an advanced study of the role of macronutrients in physiological and biochemical processes, their regulation in the human body, and their involvement in human health and disease. Application of current nutrition research findings and the rationale for current recommendations will also be discussed.
PREREQUISITES: Biology 1220, Statistics 1210, Chemistry 3530, and Foods and Nutrition 2120 or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours

4220 QUANTITY FOOD PRODUCTION
This course is a study of food service production and management. Topics include quantity food purchasing and preparation, food safety and HACCP, sanitation, human resource planning and supervision. Practical experience in quantity food production and food service administration is gained by running a food catering operation using a team approach to management.
PREREQUISITES: Foods and Nutrition 3210
Two lecture hours, six hours laboratory

4310 EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE IN THE HEALTH SCIENCES
This course focuses on the development of skills and knowledge required to find, appraise, use and communicate evidence in the health sciences. It provides students with the opportunity for the continued development of reasoning and decision making skills allowing them to integrate research evidence and critical thinking into professional practice.
Cross-listed with Family Science/Kinesiology 4310.
PREREQUISITE: Family Science/Foods and Nutrition/Kinesiology 3310 or permission of the instructor

4340 COMMUNITY NUTRITION
This course is an introduction to the field of community nutrition, which is the study of the prevention of nutritional problems and the promotion of health through organized com- munity efforts. Students develop an increased awareness of the theory and practice of community nutrition, including how it fits within the population health framework. Topics include nutrition programs and policies at the provincial, national, and international levels; food insecurity; and working with diversity.
PREREQUISITES: Foods and Nutrition/Family Science/Kinesiology 3820 or permission of instructor
Three lecture hours

4400 SENIOR UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH PROJECT
This course allows senior students majoring in Foods and Nutrition to carry out a full-year research project under the supervision of a faculty member. Entry into this course is contingent upon the student finding a departmental faculty member willing to supervise the research and permission of the department.
PREREQUISITE: Fourth year standing in the Foods and Nutrition program
Six semester hours of credit

4410/4420 DIRECTED STUDIES IN FOODS AND NUTRITION
(See Academic Regulation 9 for regulations Governing Directed Studies.)

4610 CLINICAL NUTRITION II
This course is a continuation of Foods and Nutrition 3520 with emphasis on the pathophysiology and nutritional management of disease states that are typically treated in a tertiary care setting such as liver and gallbladder diseases, renal system diseases and diseases of the hematological, neurological, and respiratory systems. Additional topics such as specialized nutrition support, metabolic stress and disorders, neoplastic disease, HIV and AIDS will also be discussed.
Three lecture hours and 3 hour laboratory

4720 CURRENT ISSUES IN NUTRITION
This course is an advanced study of current issues in nutrition research. Students use independent research and problem- solving skills to critique literature, present seminars, and write a scientific paper.
PREREQUISITES: Foods and Nutrition 2120, or permission of the instructor
Three lecture hours

4900 ADVANCED RESEARCH AND THESIS
The objective of this course is to provide research experience for the student who intends to take up further studies at a post graduate level or who is planning on entering a career where research experience in foods and nutrition would be an asset. Students are provided with the opportunity to design, carry out, evaluate and write up a research project in an approved scientific format, while working under the direction of an advisor. Some of this work may be carried out in the summer months.
PREREQUISITE: Acceptance to the Honours Program
12 semester hours of credit

KINESIOLOGY COURSES

Please note: Kinesiology 1010 is an introductory course required for, but not restricted to, Kinesiology majors. A grade of at least 60% in Kinesiology is a prerequisite for all Kinesiology courses above the 1000 level.

1010 INTRODUCTION TO KINESIOLOGY
This course will provide students with an introduction to the study of human movement, and explore the physical, social, and psychological aspects of development as they relate to physical activity. Topics include: exercise physiology, biomechanics, sport psychology, sport sociology and exercise psychology.
PREREQUISITE: None
Three hours a week

2020 INTRODUCTION TO SPORT & EXERCISE PSYCHOLOGY
The purpose of this course is to provide insight into the theories, subject matter, and empirical research concerning the psychological processes that influence performance in sports, exercise, and other physical activities.
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 1010, Psychology 102 0 and admission to BSc Kinesiology program
Three hours a week

2210 INTRODUCTION TO EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY
This course discusses the physiological response to exercise, examining both acute and chronic adaptations to an exercise stress. Discussed from a physiological systems perspective, this course will examine the functional capacity of individual physiological systems, including the muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, and nervous systems, and discuss the system’s response to submaximal and maximal exercise and its impact on human performance. The environmental impact on physical performance will also be discussed.
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 1010, Biology 1220 and admission to the BSc Kinesiology program.
Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory

2320 INTRODUCTION TO MOTOR LEARNING AND CONTROL
This course will introduce students to the basic principles of motor behaviour and motor control. Included will be considerations of the physical changes during growth and motor developmental while considering the role of feedback and practice on skilled behaviour.
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 1010, Biology 1220 and admission to BSc Kinesiology program
Three hours a week

2410 HUMAN DEVELOPMENT
(See Family Science 2410).
NOTE: Credit will not be allowed for Family Science/Kinesiology 2410 if a student has already received credit for Psychology 2010.

2510 ANATOMICAL KINESIOLOGY
This course introduces kinesiology students to the science of human movement with special consideration given to skeletal, muscular and neural contributions. Topics include: anatomical directional terminology; basic biomechanical factors and concepts; muscular analysis of trunk, upper/lower extremities with reference to sport performance/technique/training; and neuromuscular fundamentals.
PREREQUISITE: Biology 1220 and admission to BSc Kinesiology program
Three lecture hours

2620 INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIOLOGY OF SPORT AND EXERCISE
This course will explore the significance of sport across society and culture. Students will gain an understanding of the role of sport in culture and how sport is structured within society. Different sociological theories will be presented and discussed throughout the class to explain the intersection of sport and society.
Cross-listed with Sociology 2210.
PREREQUISITES: Kinesiology 1010 and admission to the Kinesiology program, or Sociology 1010
Three lecture hours

3090 SPECIAL TOPICS
A course in which topics or issues are explored outside the core area.

3120 INTRODUCTION TO BIOMECHANICS
This course introduces kinesiology students to the biomechanical basis of fundamental human movement. Topics include: skeletal, muscular and neural considerations for movement; functional anatomy; and essential mechanics and mathematics for the analysis of human motion.
Cross-listed with Physics 2420.
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 2210, Kinesiology 2510, Math 1120, Physics 1210 and admission to BSc Kinesiology program.  NOTE: Prerequisites for Physics 2420 – Kinesiology 1010 or Physics 1110 or Physics 1210; and Math 1120 or Math 1910.
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory a week

3310 INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH METHODS
(See Family Science/Foods & Nutrition 3310).

3410 HUMAN MOTOR DEVELOPMENT
This course explores the physical and psychosocial growth of children and adolescents and how it relates to their development of motor skills. Topics such as locomotion, fine and gross motor skills, and sensory impact on development will be addressed. The reciprocal relationship between human development and their environments is emphasized.
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 2320
Three lecture hours

3420 INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND CHRONIC DISEASE EPIDEMIOLOGY
This course will explore the relationship between physical activity, sedentary behaviour, and chronic disease. Students will be introduced to epidemiological concepts as they relate to physical activity and chronic disease, and will discuss other important modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors that influence the prevention of common chronic diseases.
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 2210, Kinesiology 3310
Three lecture hours

3430 PHYSIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT AND TRAINING
This course will equip students with theoretical concepts and applied experience regarding fitness assessment, physical activity prescription and client management. Content is tailored to focus on training with low-risk healthy adult populations with an emphasis on the relationships between physical activity, physical fitness, and various health-related outcomes.
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 2210 and admission to BSc Kinesiology Program
Three lecture hours, three hours laboratory a week

3510 ETHICAL ISSUES IN FITNESS & HEALTH
This course explores philosophical issues related to fitness and health. Students will discuss and evaluate arguments focused on important ethical issues arising in practice.
Cross-listed with Foods & Nutrition 4010.
PREREQUISITE: Third year standing in Kinesiology or Foods & Nutrition, Kinesiology 2020 or Foods and Nutrition 2120
Three hours lecture a week

3520 CARE & PREVENTION OF ATHLETIC INJURIES
This course is an introduction to the prevention and recognition of injuries from accidents in athletic activities. Analysis of the incidence of these athletic injuries, assessment techniques and therapeutic aids, support methods, conditioning and reconditioning exercises are discussed.
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 2210
Three hours lecture a week

3610 COMMUNICATIONS
(See Family Science/Foods & Nutrition 2610).

3710 THE ECONOMICS OF SPORTS
(See Economics 3710).

3750 NUTRITION FOR FITNESS & SPORT
This course will focus on the role of nutrition in athletic performance and fitness. Topics include energy expenditure, macro- and micro-nutrients, hydration and dietary supplementation. Eating strategies for optimal performance and other current topics in sports nutrition will also be discussed.
Cross-listed with Foods & Nutrition 3750.
PREREQUISITE: Foods & Nutrition 2120
Three hours lecture a week

3820 PROGRAM PLANNING AND EVALUATION
In this course, students develop competency in planning, implementing, and evaluating programs for health promotion and family education. Topics include theories and models commonly used for program planning and behaviour change, assessing needs, selecting appropriate intervention strategies, identification and allocation of resources, the marketing process, and evaluation models and design.
Cross-listed with Foods & Nutrition 3820.
PREREQUISITES: Kinesiology 2320 or permission of the instructor

4090 SPECIAL TOPICS
A course in which topics or issues are explored outside the core area.

4110/4120 FIELD PLACEMENT I/II
These courses provide students with the opportunity to integrate theory into practice in a variety of multidisciplinary environments. Students complete a combination of supervised and independent work experience, and share their experiences in the classroom.
PREREQUISITES: Kinesiology 3120, 3430, 3820 and permission of the Department Chair
Two lecture hours per week and 60 hours of field placement

4210 ERGONOMICS
This course will take an occupational biomechanics approach to ergonomics. This course will emphasize the knowledge and skills required to perform biomechanical analyses of workplace tasks, identify occupational ergonomic issues and use ergonomic assessment tools to modify physical demands to prevent work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs). Interdisciplinary approaches to human factors, the study of human-machine interfaces, will also be discussed. Skill development will be achieved through practical experiences.
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 3120
Three lecture hours

4310 EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE IN THE HEALTH SCIENCES
(See Foods & Nutrition 4310).

4320 MOVEMENT DISORDERS
This course is a study of movement disorders associated with a range of special populations from healthy older adults to those with neurological, degenerative or developmental disorders. Students will be provided with hands-on experiences using state-of-the-art techniques in motion analysis to understand the kinematics, kinetics, and neural control of standing posture, stepping, walking, and other activities of daily living. The graduate component of the course will require students to lead a seminar, and prepare a research proposal related to the study of a specific movement disorder.
Cross-level listed with Human Biology 8320.
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 3120
Three lecture hours
NOTE: Responsibility for this course rests within the Department of Applied Human Sciences.

4330 PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF SPORT PERFORMANCE
This course integrates theory, research, and applied perspectives to the area of sport psychology. Discussions will focus on theoretical constructs related to sport performance and provide students with a broad understanding of how athletes mentally train to reach high levels of proficiency in sport. Mental skills such as imagery, positive self-talk, goal setting, and other psychological skills will be introduced.
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 2020
Three semester hours of credit

4350 PRINCIPLES OF POSITIVE YOUTH DEVELOPMENT THROUGH SPORT
This course will explore the different aspects related to positive youth development through sport and investigate the most current research available to understand how positive experiences in sport can be achieved. Topics that will be addressed in the course include, but are not limited to, the multiple definitions of positive development in sport (life skills, developmental assets, 5 Cs, initiative), sport as a vehicle for positive development, and characteristics associated with a positive sport environment.The graduate component of the course will require students to lead a number of seminars throughout the semester, write a reflective journal, and prepare a grant application related to a topic of interest within the area of positive youth development.
Cross-level listed with Human Biology 8350.
PREREQUISITES AND/OR CO-REQUISITES: Kinesiology 2020; Graduate students need permission of the instructor
Three semester hours of credit

4400 SENIOR UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH PROJECT
This course allows senior students majoring in Kinesiology to carry out a full-year research project under the supervision of a faculty member. Entry to this course is contingent upon the student finding a departmental faculty member willing to supervise the research and permission of the department.
PREREQUISITE: Fourth-year standing in the Kinesiology program
Six semester hours of credit

4420 DIRECTED STUDIES IN KINESIOLOGY
These courses may be offered at the discretion of the department to advanced students. Conditions under which they are offered and entry will be subject to the approval of the Chair of the Department and the Dean of Science.
(See Academic Regulation 9 for rules governing Directed Studies.)

4430 ADVANCED PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE ADAPTION AND PERFORMANCE
This course focuses on factors governing chronic exercise adaptations, acute exercise performance and health. Course content explores concepts such as skeletal muscle repair, genetics of sport performance and the effects of various training modalities (HIIT, resistance etc.). Students will combine theoretical background with applied learning experiences in advanced fitness appraisal methods and techniques.
Cross-level listed with Human Biology 8430.
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 2210 and Biology 1310
Three lecture hours

4520 AGING: BIOLOGICAL & LIFESTYLE PERSPECTIVES
This course is an examination of the physiological changes that occur within the major organ systems (skeletal, muscular, neural, and cardiovascular) with normal human aging. The role of physical activity and nutrition to promote physiological function and quality of life as we age is emphasized. This course includes an examination of current biological theories of aging.
Cross-listed with Foods & Nutrition 4520.
PREREQUISITE: Biology 1220 and Foods & Nutrition 2120
Three semester hours of credit

4720 NEURAL CONTROL OF MOVEMENT
The aim of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the neural signaling, sensory processing, and nervous system pathways involved in human movement. Topics include nerve cell properties, functions of the proprioceptive, visual, and vestibular systems, as well as spinal circuits, descending pathways, and supraspinal contributions to movement. Course content will be applied to further student’s understanding of movement-related neuropathologies.
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 2320
Three semester hours of credit

4810 ANALYSIS OF HUMAN MOVEMENT
This course is a continuation of Kinesiology 3120 and provides students with in-depth case studies of how physics concepts explain the optimal biomechanics for fundamental human movements and sports activities.
Cross-listed with Physics 3510.
PREREQUISITE: Kinesiology 3120. Note: Prerequisite for Physics 3510 – Physics 2420
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory a week

4900 ADVANCED RESEARCH AND THESIS
The objective of this course is to provide research experience for the student who intends to take up further studies at a post graduate level or who is planning on entering a career where research experience in Kinesiology would be an asset. Students are provided with the opportunity to design, carry out, evaluate and write up a research project in an approved scientific format, while working under the direction of an advisor.
PREREQUISITE: Acceptance to the Honours Program
12 semester hours of credit

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