Undergraduate Academic Programs / Departments / Courses

69 English

http://upei.ca/english

English Language and Literature Faculty
Elizabeth Epperly, Professor Emeritus
Brent MacLaine, Professor Emeritus
Terry Pratt, Professor Emeritus
Greg Doran, Professor, Chair
Richard M. Lemm, Professor
Shannon Murray, Professor
Anne Furlong, Associate Professor
John McIntyre, Associate Professor
Wendy Shilton, Associate Professor
Esther Wohlgemut, Associate Professor

PREAMBLE

The English Majors and Honours program encourages students to explore the diverse body of literature in English from a variety of perspectives. Course content and critical approaches range across the discipline and include historical, theoretical, interdisciplinary and genre studies. The program also offers courses in creative writing and linguistics. Students may expect to gain both a sound background in the history of the English language and literature, and a familiarity with the most recent developments in literary practice and scholarship. The curriculum is designed to encourage a progressive acquisition of literary skills. As students earn their degree through their four years, they will progress from introduction to, through development in, toward mastery of, the following: (a) elements of the English language; (b) the research essay; (c) critical reading and literary theory; (d) the terminology of the discipline; (e) knowledge of the periods of literary history; (f ) verbal presentations. In order for students to understand the goal of sequencing of courses and skills acquisition, the Department offers the following general descriptions for courses at four levels:

(i) 1000-Level Courses: Introduction (ii) 2000-level courses: Foundation (iii) 3000-level courses: Coverage (iv) 4000-level courses: Focus

COURSE LEVELS AND PREREQUISITES

(i) Courses at the 1000 level are introductory courses that provide a basic framework for critical reading and writing at university. English 1920 and 1950 are general introductions to literature, taught from a variety of perspectives. English 1210 and 1220 are required courses for a major, minor, or honours in English. Detailed descriptions of each year’s courses will be available in the Department’s Calendar Supplement.

(ii) Courses at the 2000 level are either general interest courses or foundational courses that develop the skills necessary for further study in English. The prerequisite for 2000-level courses is at least one 1000-level English course or permission of the instructor.

(iii) Courses at the 3000 level provide detailed study of areas of language and literature. The prerequisites for these courses are (a) at least one 1000-level English course, and (b) at least one 2000-level English course, or permission of the instructor. Some courses require specific 2000-level courses.

Courses at the 4000 level are designed to give students the opportunity for advanced study of a chosen topic within a specific area of English language or literature. The classes are usually seminars that require active participation and independent study. Students must have completed English 2960: Writing About Literature and at least two 3000-level courses before enrolling in a 4000-level course.

REQUIREMENTS FOR HONOURS IN ENGLISH

ADMISSION

The permission of the English Department is required before a student enrols in Honours English. The admission requirement is an overall average of at least 75% in all prior English courses. Admission to the program will be competitive, and because the demand for the program will likely exceed the resources available at the Department, not all applicants who meet the formal admission requirements will be accepted into the Honours program.

It is strongly recommended that students take English/UPEI 1010 in their first year.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

An Honours English student must complete 120 credits, including the following minimal requirements in English:

English 1210, 1220, 2040 and 2960 12 credits
Four Pre-1900 English courses*
* One of the courses must be a Shakespeare course
12 credits
English Language and Linguistics 3 credits
Literary Theory 3 credits
Two 4000 Level English Course 6 credits
Eight English Electives 24 credits
English 4960 3 credits
English 4970 3 credits
Total 66 credits

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN ENGLISH

The completion of English/UPEI 1010 in the first year of study is strongly recommended. This course also meets the UPEI requirement of taking UPEI-1010, 1020 or 1030.

51 Credits are required for a Major in English:

Required Courses:

English 1210, 1220, 2040 and 2960 12 credits
Four Pre-1900 English courses* 12 credits
English Language and Linguistics or Literary Theory 3 credits
Two 4000 Level English Courses 6 credits
Six English Electives 18 credits
Total 51 credits

 * One of the courses must be a Shakespeare course.

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN ENGLISH

Students in the English Minors program complete English 1210 and 1220, and at least five other English courses above the 1000 level as electives, two of which must be at the 3000 or 4000 level. Students are encouraged to choose those electives in consultation with the Department Chair or Minors Co-ordinator.

ADVANCED STUDIES

Advanced Studies courses are designed to give students the opportunity for in-depth study of a chosen topic within a specific area of English language or literature. The classes are usually seminars that require active participation and independent study. They may be devoted to a major author, a group of authors, thematic or stylistic developments, or critical or theoretical concerns. Detailed descriptions of each year’s Advanced Studies courses are published in the Department’s Calendar Supplement.

ENGLISH COURSES

1010 ACADEMIC WRITING (Offered every semester)
This course offers an introduction to university writing and rhetoric, aimed at the development of clear, critical thinking and an effective prose style.
Cross-listed with UPEI 1010.
PREREQUISITE: Successful completion (a passing grade) of the English Academic Program (EAP) program for those students enrolled in the EAP program.
Three hours a week

1210 HEROES, LOVERS, GODS, AND MONSTERS: SURVEY OF LITERATURE FROM ITS BEGINNINGS TO 1789
This course uses the idea of the hero to explore the literature of England from its beginning to 1789. The course will introduce such texts as Beowulf (the Anglo-Saxon epic hero), Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (the romance hero), The Faerie Queene (the allegorical hero), Paradise Lost (the biblical epic hero) and Gulliver’s Travels (the satiric hero). Along the way, students will meet other characters, including lovers, gods, and monsters, who challenge and support the hero. This is a course in reading, appreciation, and critical analysis within an historical framework.
Three hours a week

1220 VISIONARIES, REBELS, EXILES, AND REFORMERS: SURVEY OF LITERATURE FROM 1785 TO THE PRESENT
This course introduces students to British literature from the onset of the Industrial Revolution in the 1780s to the multicultural, high-tech, globalized twenty-first century. The course investigates how Romantic, Victorian, Modern, and Contemporary writers responded to the profound social, psychological, economic, and political upheavals of their times in poems, short stories, novels, plays, and manifestos, which themselves revolutionized human experience. This is a course in reading, appreciation, and critical analysis within an historical framework.
Three hours a week

1920 INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE (Offered every semester)
This course introduces the major literary genres and focuses upon a selection of representative works. Students explore and discuss the elements of poetry, fiction, and drama. Class work involves lectures and discussions, with a special emphasis on writing assignments.
Three hours a week

1950 INTRODUCTION TO DRAMA
This course introduces the genre of drama, focusing on six specific periods. Students will explore the theatrical, historical and literary aspects of dramatic works from the Classical, Medieval, Renaissance, Neo-Classical, Modern, and Contemporary periods. In addition, this course will also introduce the genre of film. Class work involves lectures and discussions, with a special emphasis on writing assignments.
Three hours a week

2040 RESEARCH METHODS IN ENGLISH
This course deals with practical and theoretical issues in finding and using standard bibliographic and electronic sources for scholarly research in English literature and language and related disciplines. This course is compulsory for English Honours and Majors students, and strongly recommended for English Minors.
Three hours a week

2060 CRITICAL APPROACHES TO TEXTS I
This course approaches literary and cultural texts through a number of critical lenses including reader response, Marxism, feminism, historicism, psychoanalysis, and deconstruction. The course is designed to introduce students to a variety of critical approaches to the interpretation of literary and cultural texts.
Three hours a week

2110 CONTINENTAL LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION
This course introduces students to poems, plays, novels, and short stories taken from a variety of eras from the ancient to the contemporary in continental European literature. Authors whose translated works may be read include such figures as Homer, Sophocles, Virgil, Dante, Cervantes, Montaigne, Goethe, Dostoevsky, Baudelaire, Ibsen, Kafka, and Brecht.
Three hours a week

2120 CREATIVE WRITING I
This workshop in creative writing provides students with the opportunity to develop their proficiency in writing fiction, poetry, drama, or creative non-fiction. Students produce and revise new material and present these manuscripts to the work-shop. Class time is devoted to discussion of students’ manuscripts and published texts and to strategies and structures involved in writing them.
PREREQUISITE: Submission of a portfolio (e.g., 5-10 pages of poetry, 10-20 pages of fiction or scriptwriting, or 10-20 pages of creative non-fiction); and permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

2130 LITERATURE AND THE BIBLE
This course explores the influence of the Bible on English Literature from the Old English period to the present, through the study of texts such as The Dream of the Rood, the Medieval cycle plays, Paradise Lost, Absalom and Achitophel, Pilgrim’s Progress, Frankenstein, and Not Wanted On the Voyage.
Three hours a week

2210 WRITING BY WOMEN
Students explore a wide range of writing by women—poems, plays, novels, short stories, essays—in the context of historical and social concerns. The course normally concentrates on British, American, and Canadian women writers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, but in some semesters may concentrate on women writers from other centuries and cultures.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies 2210.
Three hours a week

2220 READING FILM: INTRODUCTION TO FILM STUDIES
This course introduces students to the basic elements used in the construction of films, such as narrative structure, editing, and mise en scène. Through the exploration of techniques specific to film, as well as other more general narrative strategies, students develop visual literacy skills. They learn how to understand and write about the medium of film and the particular films studied. The films screened cover a variety of styles and come from a variety of periods.
Three lecture hours a week and one screening every two weeks

2240 SCIENCE FICTION
This course introduces students to the genre of science fiction. Looking at literature from a variety of historical periods, students explore how science fiction responds to the cultural contexts out of which it arises. Possible topics include space/time travel, alternative histories, artificial intelligence, the relationship between technology and morality, and utopias and dystopias.

2260 CRIME AND DETECTIVE LITERATURE
This course examines themes of crime, criminality, and detection in English literature. Focussed on a range of works drawn from selected literary periods and genres, the course considers the roles and representations of the criminal, the detective, the suspect, the witness, the victim, and the terrorist, as well as the perception of crime and criminality more generally. Topics may include popular notions of law and order, the city as crime scene, evidence and interpretation, and social justice.
PREREQUISITE: One 1000-level English course or permission of instructor
Three hours per week in a combination with lecture/discussion

2340 PUBLIC SPEAKING WORKSHOP
English 2340 is an intensive practical course in public speaking that helps students from across the disciplines become confident oral communicators. By learning and applying the techniques that the very best speakers use, students will gain the knowledge and experience they need to overcome performance obstacles and ultimately to find their own voices. The overall aim of the course is to move participants towards an extemporaneous speaking style that they can carry with them through their studies and into their professional lives.
Three hours a week

2440 INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE STUDY – TEXT, CHARACTER, AND PERFORMANCE
(See Theatre Studies 2440)

2450 INTRODUCTION TO CHILDREN’S LITERATURE
This course traces the development of literature for children, including the folktale tradition, a survey of children’s literature before 1850, and some examples of children’s literature after Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.
Three hours a week

2550 INTRODUCTION TO SHAKESPEARE
This course introduces students to the study of Shakespeare’s plays through a focus on his comedies and tragedies. This course is a good choice for students who intend to teach high school English.
Three hours a week

2560 SHAKESPEARE IN FILM AND MEDIA
This course explores a selection of Shakespeare’s plays through their performance in film, television, and multimedia adaptations. The course includes a film lab.
Three hours a week

2720 CONTEMPORARY POETRY
This course is a study of poetic directions since 1960, exploring the work of British, Irish, and North American poets such as Larkin, Lowell, Hughes, Heaney, Atwood, Ginsberg, Plath, Hecht, and Rich.
Three hours a week

2750 ARTHURIAN LITERATURE THROUGH THE AGES
This course introduces students to the Arthurian legend as it is re-told through the ages. The course will begin with the origins of the Arthurian myth in Welsh legend, and trace it from the golden age of Medieval romance through to the twentieth century.
Three hours a week

2810 THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE
This course introduces students to the nature of language by exploring the factors that shape Present-Day English. Students will cover the basic principles of linguistics, and a brief history of the language. Topics may include languages as structured systems; dialects of English (with an emphasis on Atlantic English); gender and language; the acquisition of language; and human and animal communication. Classes combine lecture, group work, discussion, and practical exercises.
Three hours a week

2850 LINGUISTICS I: THE SOUND SYSTEM OF ENGLISH
This course introduces students to the phonetics and phonology of contemporary English for the purpose of studying the sound patterns of English, and acquaints them with the analysis of syllable structure, rhythm and intonation, and stress. Classes combine lecture, group work, discussion, practical exercises, transcription, and problem solving.
Three hours a week

2860 LINGUISTICS II: THE GRAMMAR AND VOCABULARY OF ENGLISH
This course introduces students to the syntax and morphology of contemporary English. The course will investigate the principles of word formation (morphology), and of the formation of phrases and sentences (syntax). Class activities include lectures, group work, discussion, practical exercises, sentence analysis and problem solving.
Three hours a week

2910 SPECIAL TOPICS IN LITERATURE
This variable content course is designed to accommodate recent developments and trends in literature. It is a general course suited to non-English majors, with a focus on particular themes, writers, or critical approaches. Course descriptions are published in the English Department’s Calendar Supplement.
Three hours a week

2960 WRITING ABOUT LITERATURE
This course is designed for English students who are seriously interested in developing the analytical writing skills necessary for producing clear, well-organized, and persuasive arguments about literature. It will provide students with opportunities to read, discuss, and write about fiction, poetry, and plays while becoming more familiar with literary analysis, critical frameworks, and literary discourse (i.e., the rhetoric and terms specific to the discipline of literary studies). Assignments will be based on the multi-step writing process of preliminary writing, drafting, revising and peer review, and editing, with attention to effectiveness at the level of thinking, content, structure, and use of evidence. By the end of the course, students should experience greater confidence and proficiency in their ability to enter the critical conversation about literature.
PREREQUISITE: English 1210 or 1220 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3030 LATE TWENTIETH CENTURY DRAMA
This course introduces students to a variety of significant late Twentieth Century dramatists. The course examines the plays in relationship to preceding dramatic periods and the variety of influences on them. The course examines a variety of styles, such as Absurdism, and a variety of themes. The course explores the work of a variety of dramatists, such as Beckett, Albee, Ionesco, Walcott and Stoppard.
Three hours a week

3040 CONTEMPORARY FICTION
This course studies trends and techniques in fiction in English since the Second World War. It includes representative novels and short stories by major writers of various nationalities.
Three hours a week

3050 LITERATURE OF NEWER NATIONS AND ANCIENT CULTURES
This course explores English-language literature from nations that came into existence during and soon after the era of European colonialism, for example: Australia, New Zealand, Nigeria, Kenya, South Africa, India, Pakistan, and Caribbean nations. Selected texts may reflect long-standing civilizations and ancient cultures, for instance, of Africa and South Asia. As well, indigenous cultures may be represented in works examined. Through literary works, students encounter the rich legacies and distinctive realities of these seemingly “foreign” societies, as well as the profound similarities and interconnections of these cultures with our own.
PREREQUISITE: (a) at least one 1000-level English course, and (b) at least one 2000-level English course, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3060 CRITICAL APPROACHES TO TEXTS II
This course examines critical trends of the twentieth century and provides practice in the application of critical methodology to literary and cultural texts. The course is designed to build on the knowledge of critical approaches acquired in English 206: Critical Approaches to Texts I.
Three hours a week

3130 PHILOSOPHY AND LITERATURE
(See Philosophy 3610)

3140 IDENTITY AND POPULAR CULTURE
(See Diversity and Social Justice Studies 3110)

3150 STAGING CANADA: CANADIAN DRAMA
This course introduces students to a variety of significant Canadian dramatists from 1967 to the present. In addition to examining the historical and literary contexts of the plays, the course considers the external forces affecting dramatic production throughout the period. The dramatists studied may include George Ryga, David French, Wendy Lill, Sharon Pollock, Judith Thompson, and Tomson Highway.
Three hours a week

3210 TRUE NORTH: CANADIAN FICTION
This course introduces students to a variety of significant English-Canadian fiction writers. Students encounter prominent issues and characteristics in Canadian fiction, for example: regional, urban, and rural manifestations;traditional ethnic heritage and newer multi-cultural legacies; indigenous history and culture; gender and sexual identity and relationships; family and community dynamics; socio-economic aspirations and conflicts; war-time experiences; relationships with the Canadian landscape and seascape; work and technology; the ongoing re-creation of a mythic and historical past to define the present and shape the future. Texts will be drawn from various fictional genres, and may include works of creative non-fiction.
Three hours a week

3220 CANADIAN POETRY
This course approaches Canadian poetry as a vibrant contemporary art form with rich historical roots. By exploring a diverse range of approaches to the writing of poetry in Canada, students will develop an appreciation for the broader historical, aesthetic, political, and social developments that continue to shape this vital form of expression. The focus throughout will be on active forms of interpretation-creative, analytical, and experimental-that not only illuminate the inner workings of individual poems, but also situate their meaning in the world around us.
Three hours a week

3230 LITTÉRATURE CANADIENNE-FRANÇAISE I: DE LA NOUVELLE FRANCE A 1895
(See French 4410)

3240 LITTÉRATURE CANADIENNE-FRANÇAISE II: XXe SIECLE
(See French 4420)

3310 THE LITERATURE OF ATLANTIC CANADA
This course studies works by the major writers of Atlantic Canada. It includes a consideration of the socioeconomic and geographic factors that have influenced them and an exploration of the character of the region as depicted in their works.
Three hours a week

3320 MODERN BRITISH LITERATURE
By considering the works of authors such as Conrad, Lawrence, Woolf, Yeats, and Joyce, this course examines the literature of Britain, including Anglo-Irish writing, from the close of the Victorian age to the mid-twentieth century.
PREREQUISITE: English 1220
Three hours a week

3330 L.M. MONTGOMERY
This course investigates L.M. Montgomery’s contributions as a writer of women’s and children’s fiction; as a diarist and poet; and as a regional and international writer. Readings include some of Montgomery’s most popular works from the Anne and Emily series as well as her lesser-known works.
Cross-listed with Diversity and Social Justice Studies 3330.
Three hours a week

3350 BRITISH ROMANTIC LITERATURE
This course traces the origins and development of the British Romantic movement from the dawn of the French Revolution to the aftermath of the Napoleonic wars. Emphasis is placed on understanding the social, cultural, and historical contexts in which the writers worked. Major emphasis will be on the works of such writers as Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Byron, Percy Shelley, and Mary Shelley.
PREREQUISITE: English 122
Three hours a week

3360 VICTORIAN LITERATURE
This course introduces students to the Victorian period through an examination of the ideas and concerns which characterized the period. Emphasis is placed on understanding the social, cultural, and historical contexts in which the writers worked. Writers covered include Arnold, Carlyle, Tennyson, Ruskin, D. Rossetti, C. Rossetti, E. Barrett Browning, R. Browning, and Wilde.
PREREQUISITE: English 1220
Three hours a week

3370 NINETEENTH-CENTURY BRITISH FICTION
This course examines the development of the novel in Britain from the early to the late nineteenth century, focussing on novels by writers such as Austen, Dickens, the Brontës, Thackeray, Eliot, and Hardy. Emphasis is placed on social context, nineteenth-century responses, and contemporary criticism of the novels studied.
PREREQUISITE: English 1220
Three hours a week

3410 EARLY TWENTIETH CENTURY DRAMA
This course introduces students to a variety of significant dramatists from the late Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries. The course examines the plays in relationship to the preceding period and its influence on them. The course examines the stylistic movements associated with the period, such as Realism. The course explores the work of a variety of dramatists, such as Ibsen, Chekhov, Shaw, Brecht, Synge, and Wilde.
Three hours a week

3450 BANNED AND CHALLENGED CHILDREN’S BOOKS
This course examines the intersection of English children’s literature and censorship. Through a variety of children’s and young adult texts, students will trace the history of censorship in children’s book publishing; examine how definitions of childhood and children’s literature have evolved over time and across cultures; and discover how parents, publishers, schools, and libraries handle challenges in practice. The course traces assumptions – both historical and personal — about what reading is appropriate for children and young adults.
PREREQUISITE: English 2450 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3420 FICTION FROM IRELAND
This course surveys Irish fiction in English from the nineteenth century to the present, including the Irish Literary Revival. Students examine works by such writers as Edgeworth, Carleton, Joyce, O’Flaherty, Flann O’Brien, Stephens, Bowen, and Doyle in the context of the political, social, and cultural developments of their time.
Three hours a week

3510 OUTLIERS AND EXPATRIATES: AMERICAN LITERATURE IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY
This course studies the prevailing currents in American Literature over the course of the Twentieth Century. Students examine a range of literary developments such as modernism, the Harlem Renaissance, the Beat Generation, and postmodernism. Through these movements, American writers responded to an era defined by profound upheaval and cultural transformation, including global economic depression, two world wars, the rise of the nuclear age, and the ensuing counter-cultural revolution. Writers to be studied may include F. Scott Fitzgerld, William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, J.D. Salinger, Don DeLillo, and Toni Morrison.
PREREQUISITE: At least one 1000-level English course and at least one 2000-level English course, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3560 RENAISSANCE LITERATURE
This course offers a survey of the poetry and prose of the time of Henry VIII, Elizabeth I, and James I. Students read the sonnets of William Shakespeare and works by such writers as Thomas More, John Donne, Philip Sidney, and Ben Jonson.
PREREQUISITE: English 1210 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3570 RENAISSANCE DRAMA
This course is a study of representative works of English Renaissance drama (excluding Shakespeare). Writers include Kyd, Marlowe, Dekker, Jonson, Middleton, and Webster.
PREREQUISITE: English 1210 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3580 MILTON
This course offers a thorough reading of Paradise Lost and Paradise Regained, as well as a representative sample of John Milton’s early poetry and prose.
PREREQUISITE: English 1210 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3620 NINETEENTH-CENTURY AMERICAN LITERATURE 1830-1910
This course focuses on important writers and texts who influenced the social and cultural context of nineteenth-century America from the “renaissance” through the realist period to the beginning of early Modernism. Emphasis is placed on poetry, prose, and prose fiction and to such themes as freedom, individualism, idealism, materialism, and the environmental imagination. Among the writers studied are Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Poe, Fuller, Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, and James.
Three hours a week

3640 TREMORS AND AFTERSHOCKS: AMERICAN LITERATURE IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY
Focused on American Literature since the beginning of the twenty-first century, this course studies a range of novels, poems, and plays within the context of a rapidly changing cultural and political context. The course examines how literary and cultural texts respond to and inform debates around topics such as nationalism, regionalism, and immigration as these developments redefine America within a new century.
PREREQUISITE: At least one 1000-level English course and at least one 2000-level English course, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3650 EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY LITERATURE I
This course explores a variety of different kinds of texts–poems, novels, pamphlets, essays, diaries–written between 1660 and the middle of the eighteenth century. The course allows students to consider a number of cultural themes and issues, for example, gender, race, travel, crime, and science. Writers may include Rochester, Behn, Dryden, Pepys, Hay wood, Swift, Pope, Montagu, Leapor.
PREREQUISITE: English 1210 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3660 EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY LITERATURE II
This course explores a variety of different kinds of texts–poems, novels, pamphlets, essays, diaries–written between the middle and the end of the eighteenth century. The primary focus of this course is on the literature of sensibility and the development of the gothic. This course considers writers such as Richardson, Fielding, Montagu, Johnson, Walpole, Burney, and Radcliffe, placing their texts within a larger cultural context, and exploring their connection, for example, to medical discourses, architecture, and prison reform.
PREREQUISITE: English 1210 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3670 RESTORATION AND EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY DRAMA
This course explores British drama from the reopening of the theatres in 1660 through the eighteenth century. Students study a representative selection of plays, with particular attention to the ways they are embedded in contemporary culture. Students also read contemporary culture through the drama and the drama within a larger cultural context. Playwrights considered may include Wycherley, Behn, Congreve, Pix, Centlivre, Gay, and Sheridan.
Three hours a week

3720 CHAUCER
This course provides an introduction to the works of Geoffrey Chaucer in his context as a fourteenth-century English poet. The course explores a selection of Chaucer’s writings, such as The Book of the Duchess, The Parliament of Fowls, The Legend of Good Women, and The Canterbury Tales.
PREREQUISITE: English 1210 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3750 ROMANCING THE MIDDLE AGES
This course studies the themes, conventions and genres of medieval romance. It begins with romance itself, following the ideals of the hero, the heroine and the quest. It then moves to the interaction of romance and other genres, such as devotional literature and saints’ lives.
PREREQUISITE: English 1210 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3780 THE MEDIEVAL BOOK
This course focuses on the physical artefact of the Medieval manuscript book – in particular, how manuscripts were made, designed and used. Students are introduced to a variety of medieval manuscripts in facsimile form to study the different designs that were used for books intended for different genres and uses.
Cross-listed with History 3780.
Three hours a week

3790 UNDERSTANDING COMICS: READING GRAPHIC NOVELS
This course introduces students to the elements of the graphic novel. Through the exploration of techniques specific to the graphic novel, as well as other general narrative and literary strategies, students will learn to read, interpret and write about graphic novels. Additionally, students will learn about the development of this literary genre.
PREREQUISITE: One 2000-level English course or permission of the instructor
Three hours per week in a combination with lecture/discussion

3810 PROFESSIONAL WRITING
This course introduces students from a variety of disciplines to the skills and tasks required for effective communication in a professional environment. The course focuses on the following: analytical reports, proposals, descriptions of processes, extended definitions, instructions, business correspondence, memoranda, graphics, presentation of data, and oral presentations. Assignments, designed for the student’s particular discipline, emphasize a sound analysis of the goals for each task, and the effective, economical, clear, and correct use of language to achieve these goals.
PREREQUISITE: English 1010 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3850 LINGUISTICS AND LITERATURE
In this course students apply the principles and practice of linguistics to the analysis and interpretation of literary texts. Particular emphasis is placed on metrical theory and its application to an understanding of verse forms. Topics may include a linguistic account of metaphor and aesthetic effects; the communicative function of literary language; the linguistic aspects of the performance of literature; and narrative. Classes combine lecture, group work, discussion, and practical exercises.
PREREQUISITE: English 2850 or English 2860, English 1010 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

3910 SPECIAL TOPICS IN LITERATURE
This variable content course is designed to accommodate recent developments and trends in literature. It is an advanced course intended for English majors, with a strong focus on particular themes, writers, or critical approaches. Course descriptions are published in the English Department’s Calendar Supplement.
Three hours a week

3920 CREATIVE WRITING II
This advanced workshop in creative writing provides students with the opportunity to develop further their proficiency in writing fiction, poetry, drama, or creative non-fiction. Students produce new material and revise work-in-progress, and present these manuscripts to the workshop. Class time is devoted to discussion of students’ manuscripts and published texts and to strategies and structures involved in writing them.
PREREQUISITE: English 2120 and permission of instructor
Three hours a week

3930 CREATIVE WRITING III
This is a master-class workshop for students who have demonstrated discipline, ability, and professionalism in their previous writing, editing, and workshop participation. Students revise and finish projects in the genres of one or more of fiction, poetry, scriptwriting, and creative non-fiction, and prepare manuscripts for submission to literary journals and competitions. This course includes public readings and attendance at readings by visiting writers.
PREREQUISITE: English 2120, English 3920, and permission of instructor
Three hours a week

3940 WRITING LIVES: THE ART AND CRAFT OF LIFE-WRITING
This workshop-based course offers students the opportunity to study and to practice genres of writing such as memoir, autobiography, biography, and fictive memoir. Students examine texts with an emphasis on the craft, purpose, and historical context of life-writing. Students produce their own manuscripts, and present these to the workshop for discussion of strategies and structures involved in life-writing.
PREREQUISITE: English 2120 and/or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4010 CAPSTONE IN ARTS
(See Arts 4010)

4040 SPECIAL STUDIES IN COMMUNICATION AND RHETORIC
(See Writing 4040)

4060 ADVANCED STUDIES IN CRITICAL THEORY
PREREQUISITES: English 3060, or English 2060 and permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4150 ADVANCED STUDIES IN TWENTIETH- CENTURY LITERATURE
PREREQUISITE: One 3000-level course in twentieth-century literature
Three hours a week

4250 ADVANCED STUDIES IN CANADIAN LITERATURE
PREREQUISITE: One 3000-level course in Canadian Literature
Three hours a week

4350 ADVANCED STUDIES IN NINETEENTH- CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE
PREREQUISITE: One of English 3350, 3360, or 3370, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4450 ADVANCED STUDIES IN CHILDREN’S LITERATURE
PREREQUISITE: English 2450 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4550 ADVANCED STUDIES IN EARLY MODERN LITERATURE
PREREQUISITE: English 2560, 3560 or 3580, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4630 ADVANCED STUDIES IN AMERICAN LITERATURE
PREREQUISITE: One of 3510, 3610, 3620, or 3640, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4650 ADVANCED STUDIES IN EIGHTEENTH- CENTURY LITERATURE
PREREQUISITE: English 3650 or 3660, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4660 ADVANCED STUDIES IN GENDER AND SEXUALITY
PREREQUISITE: One 3000-level course in English literature or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4750 ADVANCED STUDIES IN MEDIEVAL LITERATURE
PREREQUISITE: English 3720, 3750, 3760 or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4850 ADVANCED STUDIES IN LINGUISTICS
PREREQUISITE: English 2850, 2860, and 3850, or permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4860 ADVANCED STUDIES IN CREATIVE WRITING
PREREQUISITE: English 2120 and permission of the instructor
Three hours a week

4910 SPECIAL TOPICS IN LITERATURE
This variable content seminar course is designed to accommodate the most recent developments in literature. It is an advanced course for English majors only. The course typically concentrates on a particular author, genre, theme, or methodology not covered by other 4000-level courses. Course descriptions are published in the English Department Calendar Supplement.
PREREQUISITE: At least one 3000-level English course or permission of the instructor.
Three hours a week

4920 DIRECTED STUDIES
With the approval of the Chair and Dean, a senior student of high (usually first class) standing, pursuing an English Major, Minor or Honours degree, may be allowed to explore a special topic under the guidance of a faculty member. Before such approval is granted, the student must obtain the consent of a faculty member to supervise the work and submit, at least one month before enrolling in the course, a detailed proposal of the project, including the area of interest, the method of approach, and a comprehensive bibliography. If the project receives Departmental approval and approval of the Dean, the student may proceed with the study.

4960 HONOURS TUTORIAL
This is an intensive tutorial course in the area of the student’s Honours Thesis, supervised by the student’s Honours Supervisor. Each Honours Tutorial will be developed by the student and advisor and approved by the department as a whole. As part of this course, students will be required to produce a substantive proposal for their Honours Thesis. Other requirements may include annotated bibliographies, preliminary draft work, reading journals, essays. This course is a prerequisite for English 4970.

4970 HONOURS THESIS
Each student is required to complete a substantial scholarly work devised by the student and approved by the English Department. The thesis will be written under the supervision of a member of the English Department and assessed, after a discussion with the student, by a three-member committee consisting of the supervisor, a second reader from the English Department, and an outside examiner, usually from another academic department at the University. Students must complete English 4960 before beginning 4970.

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